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Canadian Public Health Association

Public Health 2019 Program

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30 April - 2 May, Shaw Centre, Ottawa, ON

Program is subject to change.

Sessions will be presented in the language as indicated by their respective titles.

Download the final program (PDF, 5.0 MB)

Download the Oral Abstract Program (PDF, 0.8 MB)

Download the Poster Abstract Program (PDF, 0.9 MB)

 

Flash your Badge Program

The Flash Your Badge program entitles you and a guest to discounts throughout the city. No need to print the passport, all you have to do is present your delegate badge at participating vendors.

Preconference sessions

28-29 April    Public Health Physicians of Canada

PHPC ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

Sunday 28 April     8:00 - 9:00

Join us at the AGM to hear highlights of what PHPC accomplished in the past year and help set the direction in the years moving forward.

PHPC CPD SYMPOSIUMs

Sunday 28 April and Monday 29 April     8:00 - 17:30

These sessions will engage public health and preventive medicine specialists and other physicians working in public health in sharing, responding to and discussing key public health issues. This two day symposium will include a series of high quality talks by public health physician leaders from across Canada and dedicated sessions focusing on the federal role in local public health. The role of PHPM specialists, and contexts in which they practice, will be emphasized throughout.

Additional registration fee required:

  • One day - Resident: $150
  • One day - Physician: $200

Register for both days and save:

  • April 28 – 29 Resident: $200
  • April 28 – 29 Physician: $300

    PHPC ANNUAL SOCIETY DINNER

    Monday 29 April     19:00 – 22:00

    Join the networking dinner for public health and preventive medicine specialists and other physicians working in public health.

    Additional registration fee required:

    • Resident: $85
    • Physician: $100

    PHPC Pre-conference registration

    Tuesday 30 APRIL

    08:30 - 10:00     Plenary I

    Voices of inclusion

    Canada Hall 1

    Simultaneous interpretation will be available for this session.

    The lead public health professional of Canada - Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Theresa Tam - and of the United States - Surgeon General Vice Admiral Jerome M. Adams - will come together in an engaging plenary session to discuss the drivers of stigma and discrimination, identify concrete actions that can spur systems change, and inspire individuals to catalyze action in their spheres of influence.

    Following a presentation by  Dr. Adams, a moderated armchair discussion will be held on cross cutting public health themes such as mental health and substance use. Conference delegates will have the opportunity to explore and learn with the two nations’ leading public health professionals during a question and answer period, with the goal of driving change and moving beyond stigma and discrimination system inertia.

    Speakers:

    • Vice Admiral Jerome M. Adams, United States, Surgeon General
    • Theresa Tam, Chief Public Health Officer, Public Health Agency of Canada

    Moderator:

    • Rosemary Barton, Co-host, The National, CBC

    10:00 - 10:45     Refreshment break with exhibitors

    Parliament Foyer

    10:45 - 12:15     Concurrent Sessions

    Future-Proofing Public Health in Canada: a fireside chat with four public health agency heads

    Room 208

    Presented by: Canadian Institutes of Health Research

    The CIHR Institute of Population and Public Health is bringing together the leaders of Canada’s four national and provincial public health agencies for a fireside chat to discuss the key challenges and opportunities that we will face in the next 10 years and discuss strategies to future-proof public health.
    This informal discussion will touch on emerging topic areas of public health importance and areas where we anticipate future challenges, which will include topic suggestions from the audience. Examples of topics for discussion include: 

    • Researchers and decision-makers have access to ever-increasing amounts of data. There is an increasing demand for new ‘smart’ technologies and an increased interest in using artificial intelligence (AI) approaches to inform planning and decision-making, especially in an era of ‘precision health’. What are the implications of these trends for public health and health equity? How should public health engage in these issues?
    • The world is becoming increasingly urbanized; population demographics are shifting towards older populations; we are increasingly impacted by disruptors to our environment such as climate change. What is public health’s role in promoting and supporting healthy, resilient and sustainable cities?

    This session will stimulate a lively discussion forecasting future challenges and opportunities for public health based on current and emerging societal trends. Discussants and the audience will be encouraged to think proactively to anticipate challenges and opportunities that may arise in the next 10 years, and about how public health can position itself as a leader in ensuring future generations are able to achieve a healthy, inclusive, and sustainable future.

    Speakers:

    • Nicole Damestoy
    • Peter Donnelly
    • David Patrick
    • Theresa Tam

    Moderator:

    • Steven J. Hoffman

    POLICY FORUM

    Room 213

    The Policy Forum is an opportunity for participants to have direct influence on CPHA’s policy initiatives. During this session, participants will be asked to provide comments on proposals currently under development. The results of the discussions will be used to adjust the proposals to better reflect participants’ concerns before review and approval by CPHA’s Board.

    This year the Forum will focus on two documents. If you plan to attend this session, please review these documents in advance. 
    Draft Position Statement: Climate Change and Human Health, and
    Proposed Policy Agenda on the Ecological Determinants of Health.

    The session will wrap up with a Rapid-Fire Policy Round, where participants will be given 30 seconds each to present one issue of particular interest to them.

    Speakers:

    • Ian Culbert
    • Frank Welsh

    PROMOTING HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS FOR YOUTH THROUGH COMPREHENSIVE SEXUALITY EDUCATION: WHAT DOES THE EVIDENCE TELL US?

    Room 215

    Presented by: Canadian Public Health Association

    Previous research has found that sexual health education is delivered inconsistently across Canada, with significant variation in the amount and mode of instruction as well as the topics covered. Generally, youth report a desire to learn more about healthy relationships and sexual pleasure, topics often unaddressed through school curricula. Although preliminary evidence and theory suggest that addressing these topics through sexuality education programs could contribute to dating violence prevention (DVP) amongst youth, current evaluations are limited with respect to measurement of DVP-related outcomes.

    This presentation will outline themes from the literature and interviews with experts in the field, and highlight the primary issues faced by Canadian youth as well as the need for a youth-informed approach to DVP. Through facilitated discussion, participants will be invited to reflect and share their thoughts on possible strategies to overcome some of the current barriers related to the implementation and evaluation of DVP programming in Canada.

    Speakers: 

    • Erin Laverty
    • Erin Henriksen

    Moderator:

    • Rachel MacLean

    Oral Presentations 01

    Room 202

    • Do statutory holidays impact opioid-related hospital admissions among Canadian adults? Findings from a national case-crossover study – Chantal Houser
    • Words matter: Newspaper representations of Alberta’s opioids crisis – Amanda Barberio
    • Regional estimates for prevalence of non-medical use of prescription opioids in Canada – Elizabeth Nugent
    • Changing landscape of opioid use in British Columbia: A shift towards fentanyl-seeking behaviour – Brittany Graham
    • Illicit stimulant use in the context of daily injectable opioid agonist treatment: A grounded theory study with patients at Vancouver’s Crosstown Clinic – Heather Palis

    Oral Presentations 02

    Room 204

    • The association between walkability and physical activity varies by age – Rachel Colley
    • Understanding the link between outdoor play in early childhood and parents’ perceptions of neighborhood safety in British Columbia – Savithri Cooray
    • Measuring the mental health burden and determinants of mental health among school-aged children and youth: A local public health perspective – Rosanna Morales
    • Factors associated with self-regulation at age 5: Implications for school readiness – Erin Hetherington
    • Full-day kindergarten in Ontario, Canada and school-level trends in children’s developmental health – Caroline Reid-Westoby

    Oral Presentations 03

    Room 205

    • Changing Childbirth in BC: Speaking of autonomy, respect, and choice in maternity care – Jasmina Geldman
    • Treating post-partum depression with 1-day cognitive behavioural therapy-based workshops – Ryan Van Lieshout
    • Evaluation of postnatal care for mothers and newborns in rural Uganda – Tisha Dasgupta
    • Determinants of infant feeding practices among HIV+ Black mothers: Multi-country logistic regression analysis – Josephine Etowa
    • Preconception health of women with physical, sensory, and intellectual and developmental disabilities in Ontario – Lesley Tarasoff

    Oral Presentations 04

    Room 206

    • Walking in two worlds: Western and Indigenous knowledge needs, enablers, and barriers faced by Indigenous health practitioners – Margo Greenwood
    • Nunavut end of life care research project: Solutions to improve care – Sidney Horlick
    • First Nations data as a support for primary care service innovation – Laurel Lemchuk-Favel
    • Building a conceptual framework for Indigenized methodology  – Crystal Milligan

    Oral Presentations 05

    Room 209

    • Food insecurity among Canadian youth and young adults: Insights from the Canada food study – Jasmin Bhawra
    • Children's perceptions of the Ontario student nutrition program’s Farm-to-School initiative in Southwestern Ontario – Paige Colley
    • Partnering with child care providers to support children's nutrition – Marcia Dawes
    • Envisioning a school food program for Canada – Mary McKenna
    • Evaluating the impact of a media literacy and food marketing intervention for children – Emily Truman

    Oral Presentations 06

    Room 210

    • Evaluation of cohort study recruitment methods for the INTerventions, Research, and Action in Cities Team (INTERACT) in Montreal and Vancouver – Daniel Fuller
    • Social isolation, frailty and health outcomes in community-dwelling older adults: A scoping review –  Fereshteh Mehrabi
    • Creating a Health Equity Strategic Plan that integrates community feedback – Cassandra Ogunniyi
    • Rural municipalities: The challenge to talk about poverty – Sophie Dupéré
    • Enhancing recruitment of marginalized populations in population health intervention research –Rania Wasfi

    12:15 - 13:00     Networking lunch

    Canada Hall 1

    13:00 - 14:00     Book Signing

    Parliament Foyer

    Ladies, Upstairs! My life in politics and after, Monique Bégin

    The voice of a woman in a male world, a francophone among anglophones, and a skeptical politician, Ladies, Upstairs! provides a fascinating account of one of Canada's most impressive federal ministers and her discoveries through the decades. 

    Copies available for sale, $36.70.

    13:00 - 14:00     Poster presentations - Session 1

    Canada Hall 1

    The dedicated poster session and networking event will enable presenters to engage with delegates in a more dynamic setting. Less structured than an oral presentation and with more presentation time, the goal of the poster presentation session is to allow delegates to network, and exchange innovative ideas, while facilitating productive discussion and feedback. 

    1. Risk and resilience: Understanding the link between maternal adverse experiences and child development at 5 years – Erin Hetherington
    2. Exploring relations between early experiences and children's competence across cognitive and social-emotional competence in kindergarten – Gioia Stokovac
    3. Anxious behaviours among Canadian kindergarten children: Regional and temporal prevalence and association with concurrent development – Caroline Reid-Westoby
    4. The newly revised Positive Mental Health Toolkit: Bringing a comprehensive whole student, whole school approach to mental health promotion – Katherine Eberl Kelly
    5. Mental well-being among children in foster care: The role of supportive adults – Carly Magee
    6. Comment prévenir les risques liés à la pratique du poker ? Le point de vue des joueurs – Adèle Morvannou
    7. ‘Generation touch screen’: A population-level study investigating the longitudinal link between screen time and social-emotional well-being in early adolescence – Savithri Cooray
    8. Drowning in the Montreal black community: Is there a problem? – Liane Fransblow
    9. Spirituality and resilience in the context of HIV/AIDS among African, Caribbean and Black people  in Ontario – Josephine Etowa
    10. Infant feeding experiences of Black mothers living with HIV: A community based participatory research – Josephine Etowa
    11. Breastfeeding among women with physical disabilities – Lesley Tarasoff
    12. Public health nurse delivered cognitive behavioural therapy for postpartum depression – Haley Layton
    13. Indigenous approaches to FASD prevention: Enacting the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Call to Action 33 – Lindsay Wolfson
    14. Asthma hospitalizations among children and youth in Canada: Trends and inequalities – Christina  Catley
    15. Understanding the journey to care for Ugandan children with rare surgical diseases – Iris Liu
    16. Association between beliefs and feeding practices of mothers of African and Caribbean descent and the weight status of their children – Cris-Carelle Kengneson
    17. The importance of partnerships for public health interventions promoting children’s health: Evidence from the Healthy Kids Community Challenge – Rachel Laxer
    18. Examining rates and income-related inequalities for day surgery for early childhood caries across Canada’s major cities – Harshani Dabere
    19. Transforming evidence into practice: Preschool oral health strategy – Simone Kaptein
    20. Natural experiment on trade and investment liberalization and soft drink consumption – Yassen Tcholakov
    21. Food insecurity and nutritional experiences of college students – Michelle Bishop
    22. Understanding retail settings within local contexts: Results from qualitative interviews with retail operators in Northern British Columbia – Rebecca Hasdell
    23. Running a health and wellness deficit: Understanding the cost of thriving in urban Alberta – Amanda Barberio
    24. What motivates FitBit users? – Erin O'Loughlin
    25. Consumption of ultra-processed foods and drinks and its association with chronic diseases in the Canadian population: Analysis of 2015 Canadian Community Health Survey – Milena Nardocci
    26. Exposure to fast-food vs other restaurant types in relation to the development of diabetes and hypertension: A population-based retrospective cohort study – Jane Polsky
    27. Foodservice manager perspectives on the feasibility of sustainable menu practices in Quebec healthcare institutions – Béatrice Dagenais
    28. A systematic review and meta-regression of the elderly's food safety knowledge and behaviours in the home setting – Abhinand Thaivalappil
    29. Association between Xerostomia and frailty syndrome: A Canadian longitudinal study on aging – Yunlong Liang
    30. Risk factors for elder abuse: Perceptions of older Chinese, Korean, Punjabi and Tamil immigrants – Sepali Guruge
    31. Trust and safety:  A systematic review studying the human interactions around interventions, practitioners and individuals who are homeless and vulnerably housed – Olivia Magwood
    1. Increased prevalence of methamphetamine use: A call for improved safer inhalation and smoking resources in British Columbia – Brittany Graham
    2. Pan-Canadian trends in the prescribing of opioids and benzodiazepines, 2012 - 2017 – Michele Bender
    3. Policy and programming responses to the opioid crisis at Canadian post-secondary institutions – Layal Alessandra Mounzer
    4. Examining Nova Scotia medical examiner data to inform opioid-related death research – Krista Louie
    5. Gaps in public preparedness to be a substitute decision maker: Time for high school education on resuscitation and end-of-life care? – Michael KY Wong
    6. Evaluating the Skin Cancer Prevention Act (Tanning Beds): A survey of Ontario public health units – Jessica Reimann
    7. Alternative facts and artificial rays: Health and risk information on tanning salon websites – Jennifer McWhirter
    8. "I think there should be photos": Indoor tanners' perceptions of health warning labels for tanning beds – Sydney Gosselin
    9. Maximizing research impacts on cancer prevention: An integrated knowledge translation approach used by the Canadian Population Attributable Risk of Cancer study – Elizabeth Holmes
    10. A review of the impacts of energy efficiency initiatives on radon gas levels in residential settings – Lydia Ma
    11. Screening of population level biomonitoring data from the Canadian Health Measures Survey in a risk-based context – Kate Werry
    1. Shifting perspectives - Knowledge mobilization for TB elimination in Indigenous communities – Margaret Haworth-Brockman
    1. Measuring it to manage it: Assessing evidence-informed decision-making competence in public health nursing – Emily Belita
    2. Exploring health care consumer involvement in clinical practice guideline development – Adam Jordan
    3. Identifying the training needs of Ontario's public health workforce – Anya Archer
    4. A comparative case study of community health workers for the provision of mental health care in Canada: Lessons from Behvarz Program in Iran – Elmira Mirbahaeddin
    5. Dynamic yet Invisible: Health experiences from the deaf community in the Dominican Republic – Shazia Siddiqi
    6. Pre-departure medical services for Canada-bound refugees: Health support for vulnerable populations – Jacklyn Quinlan
    7. Hospitalization related to Hepatitis B and C in recent immigrants in Canada – Jacklyn Quinlan
    8. Access to a primary family doctor among linguistic and visible minority women in Ottawa – Rosanne Blanchet
    9. Impact of the Syilx-led reintroduction of Okanagan sockeye salmon on Syilx health and well-being – Rosanne Blanchet
    10. Psychosocial factors leading some municipalities to be active in the prevention of Lyme disease – Pierre Valois
    11. Hot spots for mosquito-borne diseases from passive case surveillance: a case example with Malaria in a low-transmission setting in Zambia – Dolly Lin
    12. Investigating the potential for importation of Zika virus and yellow fever into Canada from Brazil – Tara Sadeghieh
    13. Considerations and contextual factors that impact the use of hypothesis generation methods in enteric illness outbreak investigations: Results of a scoping review – Carla Ickert

    14:00 - 15:30     Concurrent Sessions

    Cultural Safety Training and Anti-Racism Education within MPH Programs

    Room 208

    Presented by: Network of Schools and Programs of Population and Public Health

    This session will build on the work of the National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health (NCCAH) to bring an Indigenous perspective to the core competencies for public health. The focus will be on exploring approaches to prioritize Indigenous teachings, and anti-racism and cultural safety practice within a decolonizing framework for graduate public health education transformation. The session will include a panel presentation from three MPH programs; the panellists will share emerging insights and challenges faced in integrating educational initiatives in response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Call to Action #24. Symposium participants will then work in small groups to develop competency statements to help guide MPH training initatives in this area.

    Speakers:

    • Margo Greenwood
    • Gerald P. McKinley
    • Faisca Richer
    • Malcolm Steinberg

    PLAY IN THE CITY – A PUBLIC HEALTH PERSPECTIVE

    Room 213

    Presented by: Canadian Public Health Association

    CPHA, with the generous support of the Lawson Foundation, has recently released a policy toolkit to support increased access to child-led unstructured play in Canada, as well as a supporting CPHA position statement. These documents provide generic tools to support improved access, but there is a need to identify approaches to operationalize this vision within rural and urban communities.  

    Through a combination of presentations and facilitated discussion, those attending will have the opportunity to consider how selected communities have improved access to children’s play and discuss how attendees could support such initiatives within their communities.

    Speakers:

    • Katherine Frohlich

    IMPROVING PUBLIC HEALTH CAPACITY IN CANADA

    Room 215

    Presented by: Public Health Physicians of Canada

    Across the country, health system reforms, budget constraints and changes in system priorities have been impacting public health to varying degrees over the past 10 years. As a follow-up to last year’s session, which asked the question of how to best collect data to measure the success of public health systems, the Urban Public Health Network (UPHN) has been working with health system researchers to better understand and quantify these impacts on public health capacity, including changes in governance, structure, programs and staffing/funding levels. Preliminary results from a survey of UPHN member cities across Canada will be shared alongside perspectives from rural and remote jurisdictions and across Canada more broadly. Through large and small group structured discussion we will explore actions that can be taken to advocate for a strengthening of public health capacity for the future.

    Speakers:

    • Cory Neudorf
    • Gaynor Watson-Creed
    • Patrick Fafard
    • Charles Plante

    Oral Presentations 07

    Room 202

    • Leveraging the Canadian Health Measures Survey for environmental health research – Kate Werry
    • Building resilience in Indigenous communities in preparedness for communicable disease emergencies – Genevieve Monnin
    • The burden of lung cancer in Canada attributable to residential radon and air pollution – Priyanka Gogna
    • Mobilizing multi-sector knowledge for infectious disease public health – A new online resource for TB elimination in First Nations communities  – Margaret Haworth-Brockman
    • Jurisdictional scan of integrated surveillance reporting for HIV, STIs, viral hepatitis and TB  – Debra Parry

    Oral Presentations 08

    Room 204

    • Global burden of disease study trends for Canada from 1990 to 2016 – Justin Lang
    • Socioeconomic disparities in health-adjusted life expectancy in Canada – Michael Tjepkema
    • Canadian trends in mortality inequalities, using the Canadian Census Health Environment Cohorts (CanCHEC) – Emma Marshall-Catlin
    • The development of the Chronic Disease Population Risk Tool (CDPoRT): A tool that predicts the incidence of chronic disease – Ryan Ng
    • Ontario is decreasing avoidable mortality rates but not in its marginalized neighborhoods  – Austin Zygmunt

    Oral Presentations 09

    Room 205

    • Storefront marketing to teens: An environmental audit – Drew Bowman
    • How much money can be made? Using the huff gravity model to predict sales of prospective food retailers in Atlantic Canada – Nathan Taylor
    • Socio-demographic correlates of ultra-processed food consumption among Canadians: analysis of 2015 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) Nutrition – Jane Polsky
    • What are the criteria used to assess or improve the food supply quality: Findings from a scoping review and stakeholders’ perspectives – Mylène Turcotte
    • A participatory project to address food security with partnering communities of the Williams Treaties First Nations – Ashleigh Domingo

    Oral Presentations 10

    Room 206

    • Pregnancy rates in women with physical, sensory, and intellectual and developmental disabilities –  Hilary Brown
    • Grounding evidence synthesis in lived experience: Priorities of adolescent mothers – Anna Dion
    • Shaping health equity practice in perinatal public health: A review of key policy documents in British Columbia (2002-2017) – Alexandra Kent
    • Perinatal mental health in Newfoundland: Nurturing the seeds of infant mental health – Martha Traverso-Yepez

    Oral Presentations 11

    Room 209

    • Does substance use prospectively predict exclusive e-cigarette use, exclusive cigarette use and dual use among Canadian youth? – Sarah Aleyan
    • Developing a working model for supervised consumption services in a Canadian acute care facility –Catherine Deschênes
    • Patient-centered care for addictions treatment: A scoping review – Kirsten Marchand
    • Policy and programming responses to the opioid crisis at Canadian post-secondary institutions –Layal Alessandra Mounzer
    • Poly-substance use trends among COMPASS secondary school students from 2013-2017 – Gillian Williams

    Oral Presentations 12

    Room 210

    • An analysis of mental health recovery discourse using cultural cognition theory – Ioana-Smarandita Arbone
    • Forum theatre for Indigenous youth suicide prevention – Cindy Jardine
    • What does the literature say about social disparities in school-based health promotion programming? – Jodi Kalubi
    • Physical literacy enriched communities: A home, school, and community approach to improving physical literacy – Natalie Houser
    • Anxiety and mood disorders among immigrants to Canada: Sociodemographic, socioeconomic, and immigration characteristics – Tasneem Khan

    15:30 - 16:00     Refreshment Break

    Parliament Foyer

    16:00 - 17:30     Concurrent Sessions

    APPROACHES TO EVALUATE COORDINATED COMMUNITY PLANS AND INITIATIVES TO PREVENT AND REDUCE OPIOID-RELATED HARMS IN CANADA

    Room 215

    Multi-strategy community plans to prevent and reduce opioid-related harms have been emerging in Canada, yet the effectiveness of such an approach is not yet understood. Findings from a recent scoping review on community plans identified a lack of evaluated responses to inform public health practice.  Further, consulted stakeholders identified the need to improve evaluation efforts despite challenges associated with capacity. This 90-minute workshop will focus on building evaluation capacity of public health professionals to develop evaluation activities related to coordinated community opioid-related plans. 

    Participants will be engaged in discussion on the current state of evaluation findings on community responses to address opioid-related harms, the application of the Municipal Drug Strategy Coordinators Network of Ontario (MDSCNO) Evaluation Framework, and the opportunity to increase evaluation activities in their ongoing work related to opioids. Learnings from the workshop can inform evaluation planning for public health initiatives addressing opioids. 

    Speakers:

    • Pamela Leece
    • Robert Schwartz
    • Emily Taylor
    • Megan Deyman

    BASIC INCOME: AN IDEA WHOSE TIME HAS COME? AN INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP TO BUILD PUBLIC HEALTH CAPACITY

    Room 213

    This workshop will convene a public health discussion on basic income. Facilitators will provide an overview of evidence on basic income; then, through facilitated discussion, they will focus on the role of public health practitioners, and the potential policy levers at different orders of government (local, provincial, and federal) that could be used to move basic income ideas and the evidence base forward in Canada. We welcome participants who have been involved in basic income research and advocacy in their jurisdictions, as well as those who are new to the topic and interested in learning more. Following this workshop, delegates will be able to facilitate a conversation on basic income-related actions in their own jurisdictions.

    Workshop Facilitators:

    • Catherine L. Mah
    • Frank Welsh
    • Nathan G. A. Taylor
    • Ryan Murray
    • Rebecca Hasdell

    BUILDING ORGANIZATIONAL CAPACITY FOR HEALTH EQUITY ACTION

    Room 205

    Organizational capacity for health equity, the ability of an organization to identify existing health inequities and act to reduce them, is a key area of investment for public health organizations. In pursuit of health equity, organizations must assess and build their organizational capacity to engage in deep and sustained action. The National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health is implementing a participatory initiative (evidence synthesis, learning circle, direct support to public health organizations) to identify frameworks, strategies and organizational conditions that support organizational capacity for health equity action.  

    Speakers will share perspectives on how the initiative is achieving the anticipated outcomes to support public health organizations to identify components of organizational capacity needed to enable health equity action and shift their practice. Participants will learn about domains of organizational health equity capacity and a multi-level approach to organizational change. Delegates will be introduced to the experiences of public health organizations developing organizational-level change activities to support action to improve health equity.

    Speakers: 

    • Claire Bekter
    • Tania O'Connor
    • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    CAIRE AND PIPER: LEADING RESEARCH ON THE SCIENCE, SAFETY, EFFECTIVENESS AND FEASIBILITY OF IMMUNIZATION IN PREGNANCY IN CANADA

    Room 202

    Immunization in pregnancy is routinely recommended in Canada to protect against influenza and pertussis. However, coverage is not high. This is due in part to hesitancy about vaccination and in part to lack of streamlined delivery systems during pregnancy care. This symposium will present Canadian research on the science of vaccine safety and effectiveness in pregnancy, explore the feasibility issues related to immunization in pregnancy, and enable discussion of potential solutions to improving uptake of immunization in pregnancy. 

    Participants will leave the session better informed about the strong evidence base that supports the safety of immunization in pregnancy. They will have contributed to an active discussion on addressing hesitancy and feasibility issues in providing immunization during pregnancy. The information can be used by participants to strengthen the quality of advice, support championing of immunization in pregnancy, and increase access to immunization.

    Speakers:

    • Deyshayne Fell
    • Natasha Crowcroft
    • Eliana Castillo
    • Manish Sadarangani

    DEFINING THRESHOLDS FOR INDOOR TEMPERATURES AS A PUBLIC HEALTH ISSUE

    Room 204

    Most heat-related fatalities occur in an indoor setting, with exposure to high indoor temperatures forming an underlying cause of many heat-related fatalities during extreme heat events. Climate change is expected to increase the frequency, severity and duration of extreme events, yet currently there is no guidance on maximum indoor temperature that could be considered a threshold to inform prevention strategies or heat protection measures. 

    This session aims to introduce the need for the identification of maximum indoor temperature thresholds in support of effective health adaptation to heat in the context of the changing climate. Participants will be introduced to a complex public health issue, the directions that have been taken, and considerations being analyzed to inform future action. This session offers participants an opportunity to participate in the policy analysis process and influence future public health activities by speaking to vulnerabilities, considerations, and opportunities for collaboration.

    Speakers:

    • Shawn Donaldson
    • Glen Kenny
    • Marianne Armstrong

    Session chair:

    • Carolyn Tateishi

    ESTABLISHING FIRST NATIONS POPULATION HEALTH AND WELLNESS INDICATORS FOR THE NEXT 10 YEARS

    Room 208

    The Office of the Provincial Health Officer (PHO) of British Columbia (BC) and the Office of the Chief Medical Officer (OCMO) of the First Nations Health Authority (FNHA) have develop a renewed set of 15 indicators to help advance First Nations Population Health and Wellness in the Province of BC by setting an agenda for the next 10 years (2019 to 2029). This symposium will focus on a case example of how BC is transforming population health reporting on First Nations at a provincial level. By privileging Indigenous worldviews and knowledge, and expanding current population and public health discourse, the new indicators move away from a sickness- and deficit-based view of health to a more holistic and strengths-based perspective on health. 

    This session will share how a Two-Eyed Seeing approach was used to develop the indicators. Participants can expect to learn about the First Nations Perspective on Health and Wellness and how such a framework can be applied in their public health reporting, research, or community initiatives. 

    Speakers:

    • Shannon McDonald
    • Daniele Behn Smith

    Knowledge translation strategies for action – Let’s talk about the future of public health surveillance!

    Room 201

    Presented by: Canadian Alliance for Regional Risk Factor Surveillance

    A cornerstone of public health surveillance is getting the right information to the right people in a timely fashion for them to act and change for the better.

    This session focuses on knowledge translation strategies for action. First, we explore the foundations of knowledge transfer asking “Why we need knowledge transfer and what are the basic principles of knowledge transfer?” and “Is there a gap between science and policy?” Then we will delve deeper into the last 8 of the 12 steps for successfully translating knowledge to action, examining public health successes including health proverbs, chronic disease clock, making information accessible and readable, motivating and rewarding users. Then it will be time to look to the future. The upcoming impacts of new computer technologies, improved statistical analyses, data visualizations, improved information dissemination, and information technology are scrutinized. Also, what new networks of professionals are evolving and how clinicians and public health professionals are beginning to interact in an emerging field of “Clinical Public Health” are examined.

    Speakers:

    • Bernard Choi
    • Drona Rasali
    • Meg Sears

    LESSONS LEARNED FROM A LARGE COLLABORATIVE GROUP

    Room 209

    Strong collaborations and partnerships are essential in public health to address emerging issues and promote optimal implementation of best practices. This panel session will focus on experiences, challenges, and advantages of collaboration. Panelists are members of a current Public Health Ontario Locally Driven Collaborative Project (LDCP), including, Public Health Unit staff and an academic partner from Brock University. Panelists will discuss approaches (i.e., Integrated Knowledge Translation) and tools (i.e. partnership surveys) adopted to enhance their partnership and collaboration, including results of partnership evaluations that were conducted in 2016 and 2018. 

    Results of this evaluation will be shared to show areas that required focused attention, and the panel will discuss how the results were used to strengthen the team’s partnership. Through an interactive Q&A, participants will learn about different tools and approaches that foster effective collaboration with this LDCP and how these may be successfully adopted in their own partnerships.

    Speakers:

    • Madelyn Law
    • Nicole Stefanovici
    • Marc Frey

    MIGRATION AND HEALTH: GLOBAL JOURNEYS THROUGH POLICY AND PRACTICE

    Room 206

    This workshop will facilitate the exploration of the global, regional, national and local contexts that shape the everyday experiences of health and health care of migrating people and families. We will briefly share some key issues, and then will share the results of research through role-play case exercises. Participants will run through a simulated experience of the journey and settlement of migrating families as they navigate systems and policies. Through role-play exercises, workshop participants will learn how to assess the health equity impact of policy and practice through reflection on their experiences in the role play that expose health consequences experienced along the journey of migration and settlement. 

    After the role-play exercise, participants will be divided into teams to develop a group health equity impact assessment of one of the policy/practice examples from the role play. The groups will then present their analysis to inform a collective story of how health equity is compromised in the migration journey. Lastly, the group will recommend policy and practice changes that align with principles of equity.

    Speakers:

    • Lloy Wylie
    • Meriem Benlamri
    • Daniel Murcia

    Public Health and Climate Change: From Evidence to Action 

    Room 210

    Presented by: Ontario Public Health Association

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified climate change as the defining issue for public health in the 21st  century.  Scientific evidence on the health impacts of climate change has been mounting over the last year, along with media and public attention. Hear from experts about the latest evidence on health impacts–in particular the health equity implications for individuals and communities–as well as actions being planned and underway at the national level. Learn from practitioners about leading public health practices in local mitigation and adaptation. The Ontario Public Health Association will share its learnings from the development of a provincial health-related climate communications campaign. This session will provide delegates with an opportunity to discuss how public health professionals can promote collaboration with others to build greater awareness about climate change-related health risks as well as actions that can be taken to improve population health.  

    Speakers:

    • Charles Gardner
    • Helen Doyle
    • Peter Berry
    • Katie Hayes

    Session chair:

    • Karen Ellis-Scharfenberg

    17:30 - 19:30     Making Connections - a 5 à 7 with the NCCs and the Rural, Remote and Northern Public Health Network

    Registration fee: $0  

    Join the six National Collaborating Centres for Public Health (NCCs) and the RRNPHN for a dual language, interactive “5 à 7” networking event. Meet and connect with NCC and RRNPHN staff, as well as conference speakers and other CPHA 2019 participants. Learn about projects and explore new collaborative opportunities to strengthen public health in the rural and remote communities of Canada.

    Light snacks will be served and a cash bar will be available. Please note that registration is required as space is limited.

    Register for the reception

    WEDNESDAY 1 MAY

    07:00 - 08:30     CPHA Annual General Meeting

    Room 206

    The CPHA Annual General Meeting (AGM) is open to all participants and pre-registration is required. Participants must have an active membership to vote at the AGM. Those with expired memberships or new members must have an active membership by noon on Tuesday, April 30 to be eligible to vote.
    Breakfast will be provided.

    08:45 - 10:00     Plenary II

    INTEGRATING INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE AND VALUES INTO ESTABLISHED PUBLIC HEALTH PROGRAMS

    Canada Hall 1

    Simultaneous interpretation will be available for this session.

    The Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) underscored the importance of self-determination for Indigenous peoples. Public health needs to re-examine disease management with cultural respect and humility if health equity goals are to be met. For First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples in Canada, tuberculosis (TB) is rooted in colonization and ongoing structural violence. 

    In the context of the TRC Calls to Action, the Political Declaration on the Fight against TB, and the Sustainable Development Goal to end TB, delegates will learn about TB elimination efforts. The lessons learned from these initiatives can then be used to guide health equity efforts that focus on the social and ecological determinants of health and the integration of Indigenous cultural norms and knowledge in program implementation. This session will have relevance across a broad range of topics and settings.

    Speakers:

    • Marg Friesen,  Minister of Health of Métis Nation Saskatchewan
    • Natan Obed, President, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami
    • Isa Wolf, Communicable Disease Control Nurse Specialist, FNHA TB Services

    Moderator:

    • Nancy Laliberté, Director, Canadian Public Health Association

    10:00 - 10:45     Refreshment break with exhibitors

    Parliament Foyer

    10:45 - 12:15     Concurrent sessions

    DAVID BUTLER JONES / CHIEF PUBLIC HEALTH OFFICER SYMPOSIUM: SOCIAL AND CULTURAL DRIVERS OF ANTIBIOTIC USE

    Room 208

    Presented by: Public Health Agency of Canada

    Simultaneous interpretation will be available for this session.

    Antimicrobial resistance is one of the emerging public health challenges of the 21st century in Canada and across the world. Faced with the threat of losing treatment options to common infections, a system-wide approach is needed to preserve the efficacy of antibiotics. This includes having a better understanding of the social and cultural drivers of antibiotic use, including deeply held beliefs, culture, and habits that underpin prescribing patterns and use.

    Speakers:

    • Tim Chadborne
    • Cheryl Waldner
    • Armelle Lorcy
    • Jerome Leis

    Session Chair:

    • Theresa Tam

    Strength-based approaches to health and wellness: Learning from, and building on, the knowledge and wisdom of First Nations, Inuit and Métis

    Room 215

    Presented by: Canadian Institute for Health Information

    Answering the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Call to Action #19 calls for the establishment of measurable goals to identify and close the gaps in health outcomes between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities, and to publish annual progress reports and assess long-term trends. 

    Indigenous concepts of wellness are distinct from western notions of wellness, and are unique to each community’s respective worldview. What can be learned from Indigenous communities about strength-based approaches to wellness? How can these approaches that positively reflect values, culture, and aspirations of distinct Indigenous communities be applied in the context of public health?

    Strength-based indicators that are developed by and/or with Indigenous communities are key to supporting efforts to measure what matters to the communities in question. Relevant and useful health information enhances the ability of communities’ to share their own narrative of wellness, and to be able to direct programs and services specifically to their communities’ needs and priorities.

    How do we, as Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, support and answer this call to action? Let’s learn together from our unique panelists who have experience and different perspectives on approaches to strength-based wellness, wellness indicators and the systems by which they are governed.

    Speakers: 

    • Carol Hopkins
    • Jason Leblanc
    • Janet Smylie

    Session chair:

    • Jean Harvey

    Oral Presentations 13

    Room 202

    • Comparison of self-reported and accelerometer-measured physical activity in Canadian youth – Rachel Colley
    • Physical activity as a mental health intervention - Mind Fit activates BC teens – Samantha Hartley-Folz
    • Student Wellness Initiative Towards Community Health (SWITCH): A student-led public health approach to health and wellness in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan – Indiana Best
    • How can comprehensive school health improve student achievement? – Katherine Eberl Kelly
    • Identifying risk and protective factors for anxiety impacting academic performance in post-secondary students – Konrad Lisnyj

    Oral Presentations 14

    Room 204

    • Navigating the complexity of population health: Using theory of change to support program planning and evaluation within public health – Stephanie Gee
    • Public health digitization in Nova Scotia – Latifa Mnyusiwalla
    • The health belief model in HPV vaccine literature: Focus on parents in North America – Ioana-Smarandita Arbone
    • Vaccinating pregnant women: Are women's healthcare providers hesitant? – Courtney R. Green
    • The challenges and needs of immunization program managers to improve vaccine acceptance and uptake – Chandni Sondagar

    Oral Presentations 15

    Room 205

    • Anti-racism initiatives in health care settings: A scoping review – Nadha Hassen
    • Incorporating Indigenous health, cultural safety training and anti-racism praxis into MPH core curricula – Alexandra Kent
    • Unmet health needs and discrimination by healthcare providers among an Indigenous population in Toronto, Canada – George Kitching
    • Are health data co-operatives the way forward for minority communities?: A scoping review – Iffat Naeem
    • Social disparities in the availability of school-based health promoting interventions in Québec – Teodora Riglea

    Oral Presentations 16

    Room 206

    • Understanding inpatient participants in an incentive-based quit smoking program: Who persists in smoking? – Shireen Noble
    • A week in the life of people who smoke – Megan Tam
    • The SMAT - An initial evaluation of Quebec's Text to Quit Service – Christine Stich
    • La ligne j'Arrête: Results of an evaluation of Quebec’s smoking cessation quitline  – Christine Stich

    Oral Presentations 17

    Room 209

    • Implementing content-specific expertise at a provincial public health agency to support health promotion practice – Brent Moloughney
    • Accessing the NCCMT’s capacity building resources remotely: Supporting the development of evidence-informed practice skills in a northern and rural/remote context  – Kristin Read
    • Working towards a co-ordinated health system: The Region of Peel-Public Health and Regional Quality Table at the Central West Local Health Integration Network Partnership – Nicole Pieczyrak
    • Healthy Communities Initiative: Activating partnerships to achieve healthy change  – Sharanjeet Kaur
    • Using an Integrated Knowledge Translation approach in the context of a rapid review to engage stakeholders and inform policymaking on creating healthy and inclusive communities – Keiko Shikako-Thomas

    Oral Presentations 18

    Room 210

    • Developing an alcohol harm reduction social marketing campaign – Ingrid Tyler
    • Alcohol trajectories in adolescence and binge drinking in young adulthood  – Marilyn N. Ahun
    • Too little, too much or just right: Injury/illness sensitivity and intentions to drink as a basis for alcohol consumer segmentation – Mohammed Al-Hamdani
    • Examining variations in income-related inequalities in alcohol hospitalizations across Canada’s major cities – Ezra Hart
    • Increasing alcohol attributable emergency department visits in women and youth in Ontario, a retrospective cohort study from 2003 - 2016 – Daniel Myran

    Oral Presentations 19

    Room 213

    • Examining social norms and behaviors of men who have sex with men in Newfoundland and Labrador in relation to healthcare practices and experiences – Shianne Combden
    • Ikajurniq: An Inuit cascade of care framework for sexually transmitted and blood borne infections – Sipporah Enuaraq
    • The effectiveness of brief counselling for chlamydia case management – Jessica Smith
    • HIV and STI testing barriers and preferences among Alberta GBTQ Men – A representative strategy via community-based research – Michael Taylor
    • The utility of the social ecologic model in understanding the spread of STBBIs in Nova Scotia – Tamer Wahba

    12:15 - 13:00     Networking Lunch

    Canada Hall 1

    12:30 - 13:15     Book Signing

    Room 206

    Health Equity in a Globalizing Era: Past Challenges, Future Prospects, Ronald Labonté 

    Health Equity in a Globalizing Era: Past Challenges, Future Prospects examines how globalization processes since the on-set of neoliberalism affect equity in global health outcomes, and emphasises access to important social determinants of health. With a basis in political economy, the book covers key globalization concepts and theory, and presents a thorough background to the field. 

    Copies available for sale, $54.00.

    13:00 - 14:00     Poster presentations - Session 2

    Canada Hall 1

    The dedicated poster session and networking event will enable presenters to engage with delegates in a more dynamic setting. Less structured than an oral presentation and with more presentation time, the goal of the poster presentation session is to allow delegates to network, and exchange innovative ideas, while facilitating productive discussion and feedback. 

    1. A systematic review of cigarette smoking trajectories in adolescents – Marilyn N. Ahun
    2. Exploring the bi-directional relationship between cigarette and e-cigarette use among youth in Canada – Sarah Aleyan
    3. Smoking cessation pharmacotherapy algorithm – A practice tool for physicians to treat tobacco dependence – Ingrid Tyler
    1. The relationship between nicotine dependence and physical health among patients receiving injectable opioid agonist treatment in the SALOME clinical trial – Heather Palis
    2. Evaluation of Fraser Health’s community based overdose response – Manal Masud
    3. Harm reduction tends to be focused on a health mandate: Exploring politics, practices, and discourses of harm reduction in the overdose crisis – Magnus Nowell
    4. Association between alcohol outlet access and alcohol attributable emergency department visits in Ontario between 2013 - 2017 – Daniel Myran
    5. Blockchain technology: A new era for EMR’s and public health surveillance – Dory Ableman
    6. Intérêts et stratégies d’influence des partenaires et processus délibératif  en santé publique : une étude de cas – Achille Dadly Borvil
    7. Ambulance offload delay: The impact on paramedics and patient care – Nicole Mfoafo-M'Carthy
    8. Identifying adolescent co-morbidities: Patterns of co-morbid gambling and risk behaviours among a representative sample of youth in Ontario – Chantal Williams
    9. Responsible gambling: A scoping review – Jennifer Reynolds
    10. Interventions for homeless youth: A systematic narrative review – Jean Zhuo Wang
    11. Addressing gaps to innovative STBBI testing strategies in Canada – Jami Neufeld
    12. Pilot randomized controlled trial of an interconception intervention provided by public health nurses – Hilary Brown
    1. Prématurité et risque de fracture traumatique – Jonathan Michaud
    2. Epidemiology of adolescent pregnancy in a developing area: A six-year population-based cross-sectional study – Fernando Nampo
    3. Why so many neonates die in the largest international border of Brazil? A case control study – Fernando Nampo
    4. Trends and determinants of contraceptive use among unmarried adolescents in Nigeria: A multivariate analysis – Franklin Onukwugha
    5. No! I won’t offer it: A qualitative study of the attitudes of service providers to adolescents use of sexual health services in Nigeria – Franklin Onukwugha
    6. Perceived barriers and facilitators to accessing primary healthcare services for adults with disabilities in low and middle income countries – Goli Hashemi
    7. A gendered perspective on healthy equity: Protective health practices and equitable access to local built environments – Keely Stenberg
    8. Effect of corruption on the accessibility of health services for women – Emily Sirotich
    9. Pratiques d’équité en santé chez des infirmières francophones travaillant en santé communautaire – Geneviève McCready
    10. Pharmacien et santé publique : Au-delà du médicament… un plus pour la santé de la population – Dania Sakr
    11. The fight against poverty led in rural municipalities of the Quebec Network of Healthy Cities and Towns: An exploration of winning conditions – Lucie Gélineau
    12. Powerplays: A playbook for developing powerful Community Advisory Committees – Janina Krabbe
    13. Carnegie community-engagement designation and U.S. county health rankings – Emma Apatu
    14. The value of population cohorts and biobank resources to address public health issues: The CARTaGENE platform – Nolwenn Noisel
    15. Health professionals and climate change communication: An exploratory study in Northern Ontario –    Robert Sanderson
    16. The Alberta Healthy Communities Approach: Building community capacity for sustained and equitable action on the environments that shape our health and well-being – Lisa Allen Scott
    17. Support and use of protected bicycle facilities: Baseline results from INTERACT Victoria – Melissa Tobin
    18. CIHI's hospital databases: Quality morbidity data at your fingertips – Michelle Policarpio
    19. Concretizing gender-based analysis plus in policy making – Bronwyn Rodd
    20. Impact of physician-based palliative care delivery models on end-of-life outcomes: A population-based retrospective cohort study – Catherine Brown
    21. Preventability of dementia in Canadian primary care – Anh Pham
    22. Through Their Eyes: An intergenerational project exploring older adults' experiences – Tia Rogers-Jarrell
    23. Farmers' health and wellbeing in the context of changing farming practice: A qualitative study –  Madeleine Bondy
    24. Patterns of depression prevalence across socio-economic factors in British Columbia, 2009 - 2013 – Drona Rasali
    25. Health equity in cancer screening – Using a geographic approach to assess socio-demographic factors and cancer screening rates in Calgary – Harmony McRae
    26. Inuusinni Aqqusaaqtara: An Inuit cancer project – Savanah Ashton
    27. Indoor radon exposure: An important cause of lung cancer – Michel Gauthier
    28. Evaluation of current provincial/federal chest x-ray screening policy for tuberculosis in long-term care facilities – Mariana Herrera
    29. Modelling spatiotemporal patterns of Lyme disease emergence in Quebec  – Marc-Antoine Tutt-Guérette
    30. Legionella outbreak source identification in the absence of a cooling tower registry: Lessons learned from a recent outbreak – Christina Fung
    31. Contributions of social capital to community resilience in Walkerton, Ontario: Sixteen years post-outbreak – Konrad Lisnyj
    32. Boite à outils pour la surveillance post-sinistre des impacts sur la santé mentale - Magalie Canuel
    33. Multi-pathogen infection prevention policy in a child care facility – Monica Cojocaru
    34. Surveillance of laboratory exposure to human pathogens and toxins in Canada – Dalia Choucrallah
    35. Analysis of available training options for Canadian professionals in public health emergency response – André La Prairie
    36. Canada’s Joint External Evaluation 2018: measuring national capacity to protect global health - Dory Cameron
    37. New directions for an interactive multi-media resource website dedicated to communicating about public health in Canada – Iwona Bielska
    38. Immunization resources – Are they meeting the practical needs of immunization program managers? – Chandni Sondagar
    39. Public health impact in Quebec of human papillomavirus vaccination program changes from a nonavalent vaccine two-dose schedule to a mixed vaccination schedule – Alexandra Goyette
    40. Seasonal influenza preparedness: A scoping review and best practices framework for seasonal influenza surge preparedness in Ontario – Alexa Caturay
    41. The decision of whether to receive the influenza vaccine: An integrative review of nurses’ moral reasoning – Caitlin Chalmers

    14:00 - 15:30     Concurrent sessions

    BUILDING A COLLABORATIVE ENVIRONMENT: BRIDGING DISCIPLINES OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND PLANNING

    Room 206

    The Public Health Agency of Canada released a report in 2017 discussing how the built environment can help create healthy lifestyles and ultimately improve health. Collaboration between public health and planning has great potential for developing healthy built environments (HBEs) that address the social determinants of health. A concerted, intersectoral and collaborative effort to integrate public health perspectives into planning and policy development can support the development of HBEs that not only foster more vibrant and liveable communities but can also facilitate health and resilience. This session will bring together a panel of speakers to address pathways, resources and tools for better integration of health into planning and influencing public policies that shape the built environment. Panelists will share examples of collaborations between public health and planning sectors, lessons learned, and insights on strengthening the "evidence to practice" link to influence decisions. Participants will be able to identify actionable steps for fostering collaboration between public health and planning groups, and reflect about implementation opportunities in their respective context.

    Speakers:

    • Jeff Cook
    • Thierno Diallo
    • Charles Gardner
    • Olimpia Pantelimon

    Session chair:

    • Lydia Ma

    Empowering Women’s Leadership in Population, Public, & Indigenous Health 

    Room 205

    Women constitute over 80% of the public health and health sciences workforce, yet they occupy proportionately fewer leadership positions. Our overall project goal – Empowering Women Leaders in Health (EWoLiH) – is to achieve transformative systemic gender equity change in the health care, health sciences, and Indigenous health contexts through the application of a set of evidence-informed tools to increase the participation, visibility, and advancement of women and Two Spirit leaders. The workshop will begin with two presentations: one on an overview of the EWoLiH initiative and the second on a LEADS-based tool kit of evidence-informed, promising individual, team, organizational and system-level practices. Following these short presentations, participants will break out into smaller working groups to discuss the challenges and enablers to women’s leadership, facilitated by the project investigators and research associates. Participants will be able to apply the skill they learn in their day-to-day research or public health setting.

    Speakers:

    • Ivy Lynn Bourgeault
    • Karen Lawford
    • Jamie Lundine

    ENGAGING STUDENTS AND YOUNG PROFESSIONALS: WHAT CAN PUBLIC HEALTH ORGANIZATIONS DO?

    Room 210

    This workshop will focus on what public health organizations can do to address the issue of a changing public health workforce and the engagement of students and young professionals (SYPs). Speaking from literature on trends in the public health workforce and the surveys and stakeholder engagements conducted by the World Federation of Public Health Associations’ Student and Young Professional Working Group, this workshop will encourage participants to consider local application and implementation of the recommendations. 

    Based on a global survey completed with the aid of the World Federation of Public Health Associations’ Students and Young Professionals section, presenters will discuss tangible strategies for SYP engagement and metrics designed to assess the implementation of these recommendations by public health organizations. Participants will leave with an understanding of why SYP engagement is a critical issue, and specific programs and activities their organization can implement to engage SYPs.

    Speakers:

    • Manasi Parikh
    • Laura Taylor

    ENGAGING TENANT LEADERSHIP IN STRATEGIES FOR ACHIEVING THE RIGHT TO HEALTHY, AFFORDABLE HOUSING 

    Room 202

    This symposium will explore strategies in research and practice to address housing as it intersects with other determinants of health, featuring ongoing work in Vancouver, BC, Ottawa, ON and Owen Sound, ON. Specifically, the session will explore community-based research approaches that support local intersectoral efforts, including the role of public health, in tackling housing inadequacy as a key driver of health inequities. 

    Participants will learn about research supporting tenant organizing strategies to address the inhabitable conditions of single room occupancy hotels in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, intersectoral research on the role and future of rooming houses in Ottawa, the RentSafe research initiative with public health and multiple other sectors on housing habitability in rural-based Owen Sound, and a novel Indigenous-led intersectoral table on homelessness in Owen Sound. Participants will have the opportunity to explore the emergent concept of Equity-focused Intersectoral Practice (EquIP) and how it can be used to promote meaningful intersectoral work to address systemic gaps and barriers. 

    Speakers:

    • Erica Phipps
    • Eric Crighton
    • Carlos Sánchez-Pimienta
    • Magnus Nowell

    Session chair:

    • Jeff Masuda

    FRONT-OF-PACKAGE NUTRITION LABELS: EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE TO GUIDE NATIONAL AND GLOBAL POLICY DEVELOPMENT 

    Room 208

    The symposium will provide an overview of FOP labelling and summarize findings from three studies investigating the impact of FOP nutrition labelling systems. The studies presented in this symposium use innovative research designs (both Canadian and international) to assess consumer understanding and purchasing behaviours in response to different FOP labelling systems. All studies compared different FOP label designs to explore differences between Canada’s proposed ‘high in’ system and other common FOP label formats used internationally. 

    Participants will gain an understanding of the status of FOP regulations in Canada and internationally, and will become familiar with different experimental methods that can be used to assess FOP labels and other nutrition policies. The session will also provide a context for discussion of the potential benefits, weaknesses and policy implications of the many different FOP nutrition labelling formats.

    Speakers:

    • Lana Vanderlee
    • Samantha Goodman
    • Rachel Acton

    Session chair:

    • David Hammond

    Monitoring the Sustainable Development Goals: Ensuring Equity in the Region of the Americas

    Room 204

    Presented by: Pan American Health Organization

    In this session, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) will present its corporate framework for the monitoring of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs 2030) in Latin America and the Caribbean. This framework is unique in that it incorporates the centrality of equity as part of its monitoring and analysis, which is a core principle of PAHO, to ensure no one is left behind in the Region. The framework is linked with the Sustainable Health Agenda for the Americas and PAHO's Strategic Plan, and builds accountability measures into country commitments. Presenters will discuss the development of the corporate framework, its application at the country level, country experience with inequalities monitoring, and information requirements.

    Speaker:

    • Jarbas Barbosa

    PREVENTING SUICIDE AMONG OLDER ADULTS:  RESPONDING TO A GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTH CHALLENGE

    Room 209

    Suicide is a global cause of preventable mortality, claiming over 800,000 lives annually (WHO, 2014).  Older adults have high rates of suicide, and the older adult population is expanding rapidly. Relatively little research evidence exists regarding later-life suicide risk detection and prevention, and even promising interventions are rarely offered to at-risk individuals (Heisel & Duberstein, 2016). Systemic factors contribute to this problem, including increasing pressure on an already-strained public healthcare system and a relative paucity of providers trained in aging and mental health. This symposium will focus on suicide prevention in later life, sharing mental health, public health, and social justice perspectives.  

    Participants will benefit from a review of the epidemiology of later-life suicide, risk and resiliency indicators, evidence-based and promising approaches to suicide risk detection and intervention, and interactive discussion on healthcare challenges, opportunities, and the need for novel public health solutions to this growing problem.

    Speaker:

    • Marnin J. Heisel

    RELATIONAL APPROACH IN DEVELOPING HEALTH AND WELLNESS STRATEGIES FOR MÉTIS CITIZENS

    Room 213

    Presented by: Métis National Council and Métis Nation Saskatchewan

    The history of Canada has been greatly influenced by the Métis people who emerged in the west central North America with their own unique languages, common culture, traditions, and Métis Nation government structures. In 2018, Canada and the Métis Nation signed a framework agreement to begin the dialogue towards reconciliation through regionally tailored exploratory discussions and/or negotiations based upon a nation-to-nation, government-to-government relationship and approach.

    Metis Nation Saskatchewan recognizes the need for enhanced communication and collaborative partnerships to ensure the most effective mechanisms for the development of health and wellness services, culturally responsive programs and policies for Métis citizens are being considered with other community stakeholders

    This session will feature a historical presentation on the Métis Nation and the many contributions that helped shape Canada. Presenters will explore how to advance Metis Nation health priorities and how partnerships can collaborate to achieve better health outcomes.

    Speakers:

    • Marg Friesen
    • Adel Panahi

    TACKLING INEQUITIES IN HEALTH CARE: THE HEIA TOOL

    Room 215

    The Ontario Government has identified health equity as a key component of health care. As a result, identifying and responding to health inequities has become a growing concern for organizations across the province. 

    But how do we tackle this concern? Ontario’s Health Equity Impact Assessment, or HEIA, is a key tool. 

    HEIA guides organizations in identifying and preventing the unintended health inequities that may result from a policy, program or service that might have an impact on people’s health. 

    HEIA can help:

    • Build health equity into an organization’s decision-making process;
    • Raise awareness about health equity in an organization;
    • Spot the unintended effects of a policy or program on the health of vulnerable or marginalized groups; and
    • Improve the design of policies or programs to increase the positive, and reduce the negative, health equity impacts.

    Our HEIA training explores key concepts related to health equity and goes on to examine the HEIA tool in detail. Participants will think about how the HEIA tool can be applied to their own practice and follow a series of guided steps to plan for their own HEIA.

    Workshop facilitator:

    • Aamna Ashraf

    15:30 - 15:45     Break

    Rideau Canal Atrium

    15:45 - 17:15     Concurrent sessions

    BECOME A DATA EXPLORER - UNDERSTANDING CANADIAN SUBSTANCE USE COSTS AND HARMS USING DATA VISUALIZATION

    Room 213

    This workshop will provide an overview of the methods and key provincial and territorial findings from the recent study of Canadian substance use costs and harms. Following this, facilitators will demonstrate the functionality of a complementary online data visualization tool. This will include explanations of the different study measures (e.g., counts, rates, costs); outcomes (e.g., hospitalizations, deaths, policing); and variables (e.g., substance, sex, age, year) that can be examined. It will also include a demonstration on generating various types of figures (e.g., plots, tables, maps). 

    Participants will be asked to develop a professionally relevant query that can be answered with the data. Then, with the help of a facilitator, they will generate the desired data visualizations. Through attending this workshop, participants will gain knowledge and understanding of this valuable resource that they can use to help answer research and policy questions, and to inform decision-making and other processes.

    Workshop facilitators:

    • Matthew Young
    • Bridget Hall
    • Jill Fairbank

    CANADA's new FOOD GUIDE

    Room 215

    On January 22, 2019, Health Canada launched the new Food Guide, which transformed the way dietary guidance is communicated. This session will provide an overview of the approach to the revision of the Food Guide, the tools and resources released in early 2019, and next steps. This session will also provide an opportunity for participants to ask questions and seek clarification to support their understanding and use of the Guidelines and various tools and resources.

    Speaker:

    • Hasan Hutchinson

    EDUCATION FOR RECONCILIATION: DECOLONIZED AND ENGAGED PEDAGOGY - AN EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING EXERCISE TO TRANSFORM EMPATHY INTO SOCIAL ACTION

    Room 208

    This workshop is an experiential-based learning exercise created by Indigenous scholar, teacher and researcher Dr. Jennifer Leason. It was created as a call to action to transform participants’ understanding about the impacts of colonization on Indigenous peoples in Canada. The exercise is centred on reconciliation, decolonization and Indigenization.

    Reconciliation
    The Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action (2015) aim to ensure all sectors:

    • Build student capacity for intercultural understanding, empathy, and mutual respect (p. 7, #62–63 iii), and
    • Offer skills-based training in intercultural competence training, conflict resolution, human rights and anti-racism (p. 3, #24).

    Decolonized and Engaged Pedagogy
    Decolonization and engaged pedagogy aims to transform consciousness through a paradigm shift from a culture of denial towards making space for Indigenous political philosophies, ways of knowing, being and doing.

    Indigenization Through Indigenous Pedagogy
    Indigenous pedagogy is inclusive, holistic and reflective of Indigenous ways of teaching and learning. The Talking Circle is utilized as pedagogy to create a safe space, where each one is equal and each one belongs. Participants in a Talking Circle learn to listen and respect others, as well as taking turns sharing their thoughts, ideas, emotions and experiences. Indigenous pedagogy engages teaching/learning practices that connect the head, heart, and spirit to “transform people in powerful ways that may not be fully understood on a rational level alone” (Paulette Regan, 2010, p. 205). The transformation is to move beyond the mere description and theorizing about the impacts of colonization, towards the experience and transformation of understanding towards empathy and social action.

    Workshop facilitator:

    • Jennifer Leason

    THE FUTURE OF THE MICROBIOME IN PUBLIC HEALTH

    Room 204

    Research into the human microbiome is evolving at a rapid pace, disrupting our established understanding of healthy development and aging. Concurrently, the public has been demonstrating a burgeoning interest in the microbiome and how it can support health while at the same time adopting new behaviours and practices that are impacting the microbiome in ways that could have negative-long term health consequences. What does the current state of the science tell us about the individual and community microbiome, and how can that drive improvements to public health? Through this interactive session, global leaders in microbiome research will engage with participants to explore how the human microbiome shapes health and disease across the lifespan, the implications of shifting societal and cultural practices on the microbiome, and how the emerging evidence in these areas may inform the development of key public health programs, practices and policies. 

    Speakers:

    • Eran Elinav
    • Melissa Melby
    • Corinne Maurice

    Session chair:

    • Amy Cook

    HOW TO DEVELOP A SUBMISSION TO PROFILE YOUR PUBLIC HEALTH INNOVATION IN POLICY OR PRACTICE IN THE CANADIAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

    Room 205

    Local public health providers are continually facing new challenges and coming up with promising approaches to deal with these challenges as part of their jobs. When these evidence-informed innovations are effective, other public health providers want to know about them and determine if similar approaches might be effective for their locale in a timely manner. The CJPH has developed a journal section to promote the dissemination of evidence-based innovations in public health policy and practice that have been evaluated and shown promise, but may not conform to a standard research article format. 

    In this workshop, organized and led by the Editor-in-Chief and a senior editor of the Canadian Journal of Public Health, participants will learn about this section of the Journal, the types of innovations that have been published to date, and learn the fundamentals of submitting an abstract and article for this section.
    Participants will engage in a facilitated exercise and discussion to determine the types of program and policy innovations that would be of interest to the journal, and how to write this idea as an abstract to submit to the Journal.

    Speakers:

    • Louise Potvin
    • Cordell Neudorf

    NCCPH Knowledge Translation Graduate Student Awards: Panel Presentation 

    Room 209

    Presented by: National Collaborating Centres for Public Health

    The six National Collaborating Centres (NCCs) for Public Health (NCCPH) work together in knowledge translation (KT) to promote the use of research evidence and other knowledge to strengthen public health practices, programs and policies in Canada. Defined by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, knowledge translation is a dynamic and iterative process that includes synthesis, dissemination, exchange, and the ethically sound application of knowledge to improve the health of Canadians, provide more effective health services and products, and strengthen the health care system.

    Every year, as part of the NCCPH’s commitment to develop expertise in future generation(s) of public health, the six NCCs collaborate on the NCCPH Knowledge Translation Graduate Student Awards. The awards are presented to three students at the annual Canadian Public Health Association (CPHA) conference and celebrate the experience and incentive of public health students to learn and acquire new knowledge translation skills. This panel session will highlight the graduate student knowledge translation projects awarded at Public Health 2019. The three students will present their award-winning topics and KT approaches, and engage with the audience in a question-and-answer period.

    Speakers:

    • Stevel Lam
    • Sherry Nesbitt
    • Osnta Wine

    Session chair:

    • Claire Howarth

    PARTNERSHIPS FOR RACIAL EQUITY IN HEALTH

    Room 210

    This workshop, offered by the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH), will continue the dynamic conversation from the plenary on Racism in Society at Public Health 2017, by motivating delegates to remain engaged in anti-racism dialogue and action. Specifically, this workshop will allow delegates to increase their own level of understanding of racism and to move towards a culture of racial equity in order to build and maintain partnerships that will have a powerful impact on racialized health inequities. Using a combination of presentations, self-reflective exercises, and group work, the anticipated outcome of the workshop is to have participants return to their workplaces with key strategies, tools, and promising practices to advance racial equity through partnerships and effective engagement to create systems change.

    Workshop facilitator:

    • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    RECOVER: A SOCIAL INNOVATION APPROACH FOR URBAN WELLNESS AND SDOH

    Room 206

    RECOVER is a collective approach to figure out solutions that work for all and improve "urban wellness” in Edmonton’s downtown core neighbourhoods. RECOVER is using social innovation to explore ideas that achieve urban wellness, a complex challenge influenced by a myriad of determinants of health. Working with and listening deeply to communities, businesses, agencies, governments, and residents, RECOVER generated ideas or prototypes that were grounded in ethnographic research and other quantitative data. RECOVER tested 13 of these prototypes in the field that involved over 70 people from diverse sectors who brought them to life over a short (8-week) period. The constinual learning from prototyping and the process offered insights for scaling up. 

    In this workshop, participants will use hands-on exercises to apply the tools we used in RECOVER, and vignettes to share learnings from our journey. The participants will walk away with concrete tools to cultivate innovative solutions for urban wellness in their municipalities.

    Workshop facilitators:

    • Keren Tang
    • Sam Juru

    17: 30 - 19:30    Indigenous and Black Peoples public health gathering 

    Room 202

    Pre-registration is required for this event

    This gathering will provide an exclusive, safe space for Indigenous and Black Peoples to speak their realities, share their expertise, hopes and aspirations and create opportunities for solidarity and support. Indigenous and Black practitioners have identified the need for knowledge exchange, support, and network development that speaks to their unique experiences of settler colonialism or anti-Blackness in the context of public health practice. This gathering will provide a forum for open discussion responsive to the needs of participants.

    Hosted by the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health with the support of the Canadian Public Health Association and the San’yas Indigenous Cultural Safety training program.

    Register for the reception

    Thursday 2 May

    08:30 - 10:00     Plenary III

    The 21st Century Paradigm Shift: How Public Health is Getting Personal with Sex and Gender

    Canada Hall 1

    Simultaneous interpretation will be available for this session.

    By absolute necessity, public health interventions are delivered with a broadsword rather than a scalpel. In the context of health at the population level, is it possible to take a personalized and meaningfully inclusive approach that accounts for sex and gender? If so, what would it look like? In this session, participants will learn about the state of sex and gender in health science, see examples of where the integration of sex and gender in public health have been successful (and not!) and learn about best practices and recent innovations for developing sex- and gender-responsive policies and programs.

    Speaker:

    • Cara Tannenbaum, Scientific Director, CIHR-Institute on Gender and Health

    10:00 - 10:30     Refreshment break

    Parliament Foyer

    10:30 - 12:00     Concurrent sessions

    DEBUNKING “RACE”: CONTEXTUALIZING RACIAL HEALTH INEQUALITIES

    Room 208

    Measuring health care inequalities is a key step in identifying differences in access, care quality, and health care outcomes that may be considered unfair and can be acted on to improve health equity in Canada. The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI), along with experts from across Canada, are developing standard equity stratifier (socio-demographic variable) definitions to harmonize and inform the measurement of health inequalities. There is growing interest in Canada to monitor racial and ethnic inequalities in various sectors, such as health, justice and labour. In the health sector, careful consideration is necessary for the interpretation of racial and ethnic health inequalities to ensure that data are not used in a way that perpetuates racism. This symposium will focus on key learnings from CIHI’s engagement with health care researchers, health organizations, clinicians, and government stakeholders, among others, in the fields of racial health inequality measurement, racism and health care.   

    During this symposium, participants will learn and participate in discussions on:

    • The conflation of “race” and ethnicity
    • Pathways linking racism and health
    • Using “race”-based data to address and eliminate racial health inequalities in health care 

    Speakers:

    • Dana Riley
    • Mai Phan
    • Onye Nnorom
    • Christine Lund

    Session chair:

    • Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh

    PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SYSTEM RENEWAL

    Room 215

    Presented by: Canadian Public Health Association

    Over the last several years provincial and territorial governments have made significant adjustments to the ways in which they deliver health services, including public health. The resulting changes have raised concerns that these systems will no longer be able to meet the current mandate or address future concerns regarding public health service delivery. The Canadian Public Health Association (CPHA) ‒ with the assistance of an expert advisory panel of senior public health professionals, CPHA’s Public Policy Committee and Board of Directors, and an electronic membership consultation ‒ has developed a discussion paper that explores the fundamentals of public health governance in Canada, and a position statement describing the Association’s perspective on the future of public health service delivery.   

    The purpose of this workshop is to review the recommendations presented in the position statement and to seek members’ viewpoints on how to develop and implement advocacy concerning the future direction of public health delivery in Canada.

    Speakers:

    • Ian Culbert
    • Frank Welsh

    TRANSFORMING PUBLIC HEALTH KNOWLEDGE INTO ACTION FOR FIRST NATIONS 

    Room 206

    Presented by: Assembly of First Nations

    Public health frameworks, strategies and models guide interventions and policies to promote health and reduce health disparities. First Nations' contributions to the scope and methodologies of evidence mobilizing and the formulation of public health interventions can strengthen uptake and relevance. 

    This collaborator session will emphasize public health agendas developed by First Nations that stimulate approaches that are established on strengths-based Indigenous methodologies, governance and knowledge systems.

    Speakers:

    • Bonnie Healy
    • Jasmine Fournier

    Session chair:

    • Marlene Larocque

    Oral Presentations 20

    Room 204

    • Developing an online education course on health impact assessment (HIA) for increasing HIA practice in Canada – Thierno Diallo
    • Free online-learning tools to support the development of health equity champions – Faith Layden
    • Assessing the impact of a guide to share local data with community partners to improve health equity – Cassandra Ogunniyi
    • How should we measure area income when we do health inequalities analysis? – Charles Plante
    • Reducing health inequities through intersectoral action: Balancing equity in health with equity for other social goods – Maxwell Smith

    Oral Presentations 21

    Room 205

    • Identifying barriers of access and retention in opioid agonist treatment in British Columbia –    Brittany Graham
    • Experiences of stigma and access to harm reduction services among women who use opioids: Implications for action – Rose Schmidt
    • Best practices across the continuum of care for the treatment of opioid use disorder – Sheena Taha
    • The Cedar Project: Experiences of interpersonal racism among young Indigenous people who have used drugs in Prince George and Vancouver – Richa Sharma
    • Increasing access to take home naloxone in response to British Columbia's opioid overdose crisis –Sierra Williams

    Oral Presentations 22

    Room 202

    • Disaster Recovery Triple P - Supporting children's mental health after an emergency – Peggy Govers
    • Interventions to improve household disaster preparedness in the general public: A scoping review – Karen Paik
    • Syndromic surveillance of asylum seekers in temporary housing in Montreal – Anna Urbanek
    • Enhancing health systems performance by learning from best practice models of public health & care for refugee population in Canada using an opportunity identification matrix – Sheikh Muhammad Zeeshan Qadar
    • Rapid qualitative analyses: bringing community feedback to decision-making in real time during an Ebola outbreak response – Vivienne Walz

    Oral Presentations 23

    Room 209

    • The Global Governance of Antimicrobial Resistance: A Scoping Review – Ronald Labonte
    • An analysis of patient and visit characteristics affecting length of stay in the emergency department  – Iwona Bielska
    • A citizen science approach to decrease residence-based fall-related injuries – James Chauvin
    • Clinical public health – Bernard Choi
    • Building organizational evidence-informed decision making capacity: Expansion of the online Evidence-Informed Decision Making Skills Assessment Tool – Claire Howarth

    Oral Presentations 24

    Room 210

    • “Community helps contribute to our mental health”: Development of a health resiliency intervention for Métis children – Elizabeth Cooper
    • Promoting healthy urban environments for young Indigenous peoples: The case of M'Wikwedong Indigenous Friendship Centre – Carlos Sanchez-Pimienta
    • Is participation in out-of-school programs linked to students’ health, social and educational outcomes? – Jennifer Enns
    • Evaluating sustainability of the Healthy Kids Community Challenge: Findings from a survey with community stakeholders across Ontario – Rachel Laxer
    • "We saw the most success when there was true collaboration":  A process evaluation to evaluate implementation of Ontario's Healthy Kids Community Challenge using stakeholder interviews  –  Michelle Vine

    Oral Presentations 25

    Room 213

    • Operationalizing the Canadian Suicide Surveillance Indicator Framework – Melissa Baker
    • The application of sex and gender-based analysis in support of mental health and psychological well-being in the workplace – Ivy Bourgeault
    • YMCA Mindfulness Programs: Early intervention for youth experiencing anxiety  – Samantha Hartley-Folz
    • The Status of Mental Health in Ottawa: How Ottawa Public Health developed their first local mental health surveillance report – Ben Leikin
    • Measuring positive mental health in Canada: A process for measure selection – Heather Orpana

    12:00 - 13:00     Networking lunch

    Canada Hall 1

    13:00 - 14:30     Concurrent sessions

    ADVANCING INDIGENOUS EQUITY IN HEALTH CARE USING STORYTELLING AND ROLE PLAY

    Room 208

    This workshop uses storytelling to demonstrate the gaps in knowledge and practice that compromise culturally safe, quality health care for Indigenous patients, families and communities. The exercises will demonstrate strategies to address these gaps through experiential learning activities that build concrete skills. The aim of this workshop is to improve understanding of the complexity of Indigenous determinants of health, and to share strategies on how to effectively engage and build capacity among health professionals and trainees.

    This workshop will provide experiential learning opportunities for health educators and practitioners to improve their ability to offer culturally safe care for Indigenous people. In addition, the workshop will support participants to develop theatre-based training activities in their own health service settings. The presenters will illustrate a range of challenges facing Indigenous people, both within the health care system and in the social determinants of health. Narratives will be presented, drawing on examples from Indigenous health experiences that demonstrate the challenges Indigenous people face.

    Participants will work in teams to explore the issues in the cases, reflecting on Indigenous determinants of health. Participants will construct and present a theatrical sketch that rewrites the scenario in line with a culturally safe approach. The workshop facilitators will then guide a reflection on the process and explore ways participants can apply this approach to their own settings.

    Workshop facilitators:

    • Lloy Wylie
    • Danielle Alcock
    • Abrar Ali

    ALIGNING TWO WORLDS: WHAT CAN AMR SURVEILLANCE DO FOR PUBLIC HEALTH?

    Room 204

    This symposium will begin with a brief review of the Federal Framework and Action Plan and the Pan-Canadian Framework for Action. The session will then move to describe surveillance systems and datasets that provide a picture of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Canada, particularly between acute- and community-care settings. Finally, the session will summarize new resources and products designed to help public health stakeholders make better use of the data for planning and responses. 

    Providing the context for new developments in the fight against AMR, including surveillance, can help to inform delegates of the shared and crucial responsibility of all stakeholders to reduce AMR. More importantly, the symposium will provide valuable information on how to find and use AMR data for day-to-day research or public health decision-making and policy.  

    Speakers:

    • Jacqueline Arthur
    • James Brooks
    • Jason Vanstone
    • Robert Parker

    Session chairs:

    • Margaret Haworth-Brockman
    • Aleksandra Wierzbowski

    ANALYTICAL INNOVATION IN PUBLIC HEALTH EVIDENCE AND PRACTICE: INTEGRATING SEX, GENDER, KEY IDENTITY FACTORS AND SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH

    Room 205

    Health inequities between and among men, women, girls, boys and gender-diverse populations have been increasingly recognized. Efforts to address these inequities to improve public health practice and action are increasingly informed by awareness of the social determinants of health and how these intersect to unequally affect health outcomes. Advancements in data and analytical tools can strengthen evidence-based interventions that are better tailored to the needs and circumstances of diverse groups of the population, and that have greater potential impact.

    Making the linkages between the social determinants of health approach and rigorous application of sex and gender considerations in policy, program and research, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) and other health promotion partners have strengthened evidence, interventions and programs to reduce health inequities in Canada. 

    Speakers:

    • Beth Jackson
    • Miga Chultem
    • Aseefa Sarang
    • Roberto Ortiz
    • Bilkis Vissandjée

    BUILDING EVIDENCE-BASED COMMUNITY GUIDELINES TO END HOMELESSNESS USING MULTI-STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT

    Room 206

    Individuals who face homelessness or who are vulnerably housed have higher risks of poor health and social outcomes. Limited access to basic social supports, stigma that both affects homeless persons and may marginalize their practitioners, and mental illness are key priorities for evidence-based community guidelines. 

    Our project aims to assess the effectiveness of a broad range of interventions for homeless and vulnerably-housed individuals. Facilitators reviewed the literature on experiences of homeless individuals who engage with services; by partnering with primary care, public health, community organizations and youth advocates, we have drafted recommendations to improve the care and health outcomes of people experiencing homelessness. 

    A panel of primary care researchers and individuals with lived experience of homelessness will present on current knowledge synthesis and mobilization strategies being used to improve health and social outcomes. Delegates will be able to use this information to inform program design and implementation, and act on identified research gaps.

    Speakers: 

    • Tim Aubry
    • Olivia Magwood
    • Ammar Saad

    Session chair:

    • Kevin Pottie

    CHEERS AND FEARS OF VAPING E-CIGARETTES: CUTTING-EDGE RESEARCH, POLICY AND PRACTICE 

    Room 209

    To answer the three questions, speakers will present findings from systematic literature reviews, select published studies, and four of their Canadian studies:  1) Cohort Study of 1,040 youth, 60% of whom are regular vapers; 2) Concept Mapping study on the experiences smokers have when trying to quit smoking by vaping; 3) 14 Focus Groups – half with youth vapers and non-vapers, and half with adults; and 4) Point-of-Sale study in 50 stores in five cities. The manager of a large Tobacco Control Area Network will present on the implications of findings for public health action and on a comprehensive strategy for reducing potential harms while realizing any potential benefits. Participants will be engaged in small-group work sessions in which they will be asked to draw out implications of what they have heard for policy development and programmatic intervention at local, provincial and federal levels.  

    Speakers:

    • Robert Schwartz
    • Lori Diemert
    • Shawn O'Connor
    • Cindy Baker-Barill

    MEASURING HEALTH INEQUALITIES: APPLYING A TOOLKIT DEVELOPED BY THE CANADIAN INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH INFORMATION

    Room 213

    Health equity is a growing priority for healthcare systems in Canada; however, there is limited routine measurement and reporting of inequalities in health care access, quality and outcomes. This workshop will provide participants with an overview of a toolkit developed by the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) to assist analysts and researchers with measuring and reporting on health inequalities. Launched in October 2018, this toolkit is organized in 3 phases: planning your analysis, analyzing your data and reporting your findings. In this session, participants will learn how to use standard equity stratifier definitions, identify available stratifiers in selected CIHI and Statistics Canada data, calculate stratified indicator rates and summary measures, and apply key guidelines for interpreting and reporting on health inequalities. Practical examples will be based on commonly used health indicators, and will draw on participants’ experience and areas of interest. This toolkit is available online. Participants can also access free eLearning courses that expand on the workshop content through CIHI’s Learning Centre.

    Workshop facilitators:

    • Erin Pichora
    • Christina Catley
    • Kinsey Beck

    Responding to Climate Change as a Public Health Professional

    Room 202

    Climate change is already affecting the physical and mental health of Canadians and promises to do much greater harm in the coming decades unless we take swift action to slow climate change. The World Health Organization has called  climate change “the greatest health threat of the 21st century” and the Lancet Commission has declared that tackling climate change could be “ the greatest global health opportunity of the 21st century”.  

    In this workshop, presenters will provide a summary of the health impacts associated with climate change, present the trends in emissions across the country, and discuss the climate solutions that can produce immediate health co-benefits for the jurisdictions that take action. In roundtable discussions, participants will be asked to identify the climate-related health impacts they are witnessing in their communities, the climate solutions that would be most effective in their communities, and the local partners with whom they could collaborate. 

    Speakers:

    • Kim Perrotta
    • Helen Marie Doyle

    TAILORED TO FIT: MAKING ADAPTATIONS TO EVIDENCE-BASED PUBLIC HEALTH PROGRAMS

    Room 215

    Adaptations to evidence-based public health programs are commonplace. These adaptations are primarily made to enhance the cultural relevance of the program, and can therefore improve uptake of the program. However, adaptations also tend to be reactive and disconnected from the theory and evidence base of the program, which threatens programs’ effectiveness. A practical method of adapting programs while considering their theory and evidence basis is required. 

    In this workshop, facilitators will describe when, why and how adaptations are made to public health programs. Practical implementation science frameworks will be discussed. Conference delegates will be engaged in two interactive activities: 1) identifying and unpacking different types of adaptations, and 2) using frameworks to plan adaptations so that the learnings can be directly applied to their own work. By the end of this workshop, delegates will have a sound understanding of how to consider program adaptations before and during implementation.

    Workshop facilitator:

    • Julia E. Moore

    VACCINATION IN PREGNANCY: TO VACCINATE OR NOT….THAT IS THE QUESTION!

    Room 210

    Vaccination during pregnancy offers a safe option that improves outcomes for mothers and babies, yet many pregnant women choose not to receive vaccinations. By understanding the factors that influence decisions and practices of women’s healthcare providers, improvements and changes to antenatal care provision can be recommended. Ultimately, changes in practice can have a long-term impact on the number of cases of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality related to vaccine-preventable illnesses during pregnancy, and this can be translated into potential cost savings to the healthcare system.  

    Symposium participants will gain insight into current practices of maternal healthcare providers and the barriers to optimizing immunization coverage during pregnancy. Participants will learn about strategies to mitigate the challenges and how they can receive training to feel confident and competent counselling about vaccination during pregnancy. They will receive specific guidance on the influenza and Tdap vaccines.

    Speakers:

    • Courtney Green
    • Julie van Schalkwyk
    • Vanessa Poliquin

    Session chair:

    • Jocelyn Cook

    14:30 - 16:00     Plenary IV

    Building Social Connections for Health and Happiness 

    Canada Hall 1

    Simultaneous interpretation will be available for this session.

    We are in the midst of an epidemic of social isolation. While certain populations are at greater risk, loneliness does not discriminate and can affect anyone. Various factors associated with increasing social isolation include changing family structures, increased social and professional mobility, weakening community institutions, and increased reliance on digital media. Social connectedness and opportunities for meaningful community involvement have been shown to protect against loneliness and associated negative health and wellness outcomes. This session will explore the relationship between loneliness and wellness, the social determinants of health, and current trends in community participation in Canada, and will reflect on how to promote and develop communities with the goal of strengthening social connectedness. 

    Speakers:

    • John Helliwell, Senior Fellow, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research
    • Kate Mulligan, Director of Policy and Communication, Alliance for Healthier Communities

    Moderator:

    • Yan Kestens, Scientific Chair, Public Health 2019; Professeur agrégé, Département de médicine sociale et preventive, École de santé publique, l'Université de Montréal