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Canadian Public Health Association

Séances simultanées 8

Jeudi le 2 mai - 13 h à 14 h 30

Les séances seront présentées dans la langue de leur titre.

Cette section pourrait faire l’objet de modifications.

ADVANCING INDIGENOUS EQUITY IN HEALTH CARE USING STORYTELLING AND ROLE PLAY

This workshop uses storytelling to demonstrate the gaps in knowledge and practice that compromise culturally safe, quality health care for Indigenous patients, families and communities. The exercises will demonstrate strategies to address these gaps through experiential learning activities that build concrete skills. The aim of this workshop is to improve understanding of the complexity of Indigenous determinants of health, and to share strategies on how to effectively engage and build capacity among health professionals and trainees.

This workshop will provide experiential learning opportunities for health educators and practitioners to improve their ability to offer culturally safe care for Indigenous people. In addition, the workshop will support participants to develop theatre-based training activities in their own health service settings. The presenters will illustrate a range of challenges facing Indigenous people, both within the health care system and in the social determinants of health. Narratives will be presented, drawing on examples from Indigenous health experiences that demonstrate the challenges Indigenous people face.

Participants will work in teams to explore the issues in the cases, reflecting on Indigenous determinants of health. Participants will construct and present a theatrical sketch that rewrites the scenario in line with a culturally safe approach. The workshop facilitators will then guide a reflection on the process and explore ways participants can apply this approach to their own settings.


ALIGNING TWO WORLDS: WHAT CAN AMR SURVEILLANCE DO FOR PUBLIC HEALTH?

This symposium will begin with a brief review of the Federal Framework and Action Plan and the Pan-Canadian Framework for Action. The session will then move to describe surveillance systems and datasets that provide a picture of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Canada, particularly between acute- and community-care settings. Finally, the session will summarize new resources and products designed to help public health stakeholders make better use of the data for planning and responses. 

Providing the context for new developments in the fight against AMR, including surveillance, can help to inform delegates of the shared and crucial responsibility of all stakeholders to reduce AMR. More importantly, the symposium will provide valuable information on how to find and use AMR data for day-to-day research or public health decision-making and policy.  


ANALYTICAL INNOVATION IN PUBLIC HEALTH EVIDENCE AND PRACTICE: INTEGRATING SEX, GENDER, KEY IDENTITY FACTORS AND SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH

Health inequities between and among men, women, girls, boys and gender-diverse populations have been increasingly recognized. Efforts to address these inequities to improve public health practice and action are increasingly informed by awareness of the social determinants of health and how these intersect to unequally affect health outcomes. Advancements in data and analytical tools can strengthen evidence-based interventions that are better tailored to the needs and circumstances of diverse groups of the population, and that have greater potential impact.  

Making the linkages between the social determinants of health approach and rigorous application of sex and gender considerations in policy, program and research, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) and other health promotion partners have strengthened evidence, interventions and programs to reduce health inequities in Canada. 


APPROACHES TO EVALUATE COORDINATED COMMUNITY PLANS AND INITIATIVES TO PREVENT AND REDUCE OPIOID-RELATED HARMS IN CANADA

Multi-strategy community plans to prevent and reduce opioid-related harms have been emerging in Canada, yet the effectiveness of such an approach is not yet understood. Findings from a recent scoping review on community plans identified a lack of evaluated responses to inform public health practice.  Further, consulted stakeholders identified the need to improve evaluation efforts despite challenges associated with capacity. This 90-minute workshop will focus on building evaluation capacity of public health professionals to develop evaluation activities related to coordinated community opioid-related plans. 

Participants will be engaged in discussion on the current state of evaluation findings on community responses to address opioid-related harms, the application of the Municipal Drug Strategy Coordinators Network of Ontario (MDSCNO) Evaluation Framework, and the opportunity to increase evaluation activities in their ongoing work related to opioids. Learnings from the workshop can inform evaluation planning for public health initiatives addressing opioids. 


BUILDING EVIDENCE-BASED COMMUNITY GUIDELINES TO END HOMELESSNESS USING MULTI-STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT

Individuals who face homelessness or who are vulnerably housed have higher risks of poor health and social outcomes. Limited access to basic social supports, stigma that affects both homeless persons and may marginalize their practitioners, and mental illness are key priorities for evidence-based community guidelines. 

Our project aims to assess the effectiveness of a broad range of interventions for homeless and vulnerably-housed individuals. Facilitators reviewed the literature on experiences of homeless individuals that engage with services; by partnering with primary care, public health, community organizations and youth advocates, we have drafted recommendations to improve the care and health outcomes of people experiencing homelessness. 

A panel of primary care researchers and individuals with lived experience of homelessness will present on current knowledge synthesis and mobilization strategies being used to improve health and social outcomes. Delegates will be able to use this information to inform program design and implementation, and act on identified research gaps.


CHEERS AND FEARS OF VAPING E-CIGARETTES: CUTTING-EDGE RESEARCH, POLICY AND PRACTICE 

To answer the three questions, speakers will present findings from systematic literature reviews, select published studies, and four of their Canadian studies:  1) Cohort Study of 1,040 youth, 60% of whom are regular vapers; 2) Concept Mapping study on the experiences smokers have when trying to quit smoking by vaping; 3) 14 Focus Groups – half with youth vapers and non-vapers, and half with adults; and 4) Point-of-Sale study in 50 stores in five cities. The manager of a large Tobacco Control Area Network will present on the implications of findings for public health action and on a comprehensive strategy for reducing potential harms while realizing any potential benefits. Participants will be engaged in small-group work sessions in which they will be asked to draw out implications of what they have heard for policy development and programmatic intervention at local, provincial and federal levels.  


DATA-DRIVEN PLANNING – GETTING LOCAL

Neighbourhoods can differ dramatically in their health risks and needs, and thus may require more targeted health planning. Acquiring data at the neighbourhood level, using indicators such as health service utilization, can help health planners identify priority neighbourhoods; this information can be used to improve and deliver programs and services accordingly. Despite these well-recognized benefits, neighbourhoods are not uniformly defined. A basic first step to ‘getting local’ with health planning, the process for establishing meaningful and agreeable neighbourhood geographies continues to pose a challenge.

This workshop, led by the Population Health Solutions Lab, will introduce a new tool designed to guide local agencies/organizations through a collaborative process to define neighbourhood geographies in a consistent manner. Intended for public health leaders and planners, this workshop will explore specific steps, roadblocks and opportunities for achieving consensus on meaningful neighbourhood geographies and how this facilitates stronger health systems planning. 


MEASURING HEALTH INEQUALITIES: APPLYING A TOOLKIT DEVELOPED BY THE CANADIAN INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH INFORMATION

Health equity is a growing priority for healthcare systems in Canada; however, there is limited routine measurement and reporting of inequalities in health care access, quality and outcomes. This workshop will provide participants with an overview of a toolkit developed by the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) to assist analysts and researchers with measuring and reporting on health inequalities. Launched in October 2018, ‘Measuring Health Inequalities: A Toolkit’ is organized in three phases: planning your analysis, analyzing your data and reporting your findings. Using health indicator examples, participants will learn how to use standard equity stratifier definitions, identify available stratifiers in selected CIHI and Statistics Canada data, calculate stratified indicator rates and summary measures, and apply key guidelines for interpreting and reporting inequalities. This toolkit is available online