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Canadian Public Health Association

Séances simultanées 6

mecredi le 30 mai de 15 h 45 à 17 h 15

Les séances seront présentées dans la langue de leur titre. 

TA SAANTII - MÉTIS HEAlTH

présenté par : Métis National Council

Métis people make up 1/3 of the Aboriginal population in British Columbia. Recognized by the Métis National Council (MNC), the Provincial Government of British Columbia and the Federal Government of Canada, the Métis Nation British Columbia (MNBC) is the official governing body of the Métis in BC.  MNBC is one of the five Governing Members of MNC and represents nearly 90,000 self-identified Métis people in British Columbia, of that, nearly 17,000 are provincially registered Métis Citizens with MNBC.

As assumptions are made that Métis people receive programming and services from the First Nations Health Authority, the session will explore the need to move away from subsuming Métis under First Nations/Aboriginal programming and policies. Health information on Métis will be shared as well as why there is a need for Métis-specific policy, programs and services in cultural safety training in British Columbia. 
 


CAN BIGGER AND BETTER DATA MAKE HEALTHIER CITIES?

Les présentateurs et présentatrices des séances peuvent répondre aux questions en français ou en anglais.

This interactive symposium will stimulate dialogue and new thinking on how bigger and better data can be harnessed to guide decision-making, citizen engagement, and action on healthy, equitable cities. We will use a rapid, engaging presentation format known as Ignite (20 slides x 15 seconds) to engage researchers and knowledge users who bridge public health, geography, computer science, and urban planning. These thought leaders will offer diverse evidence and perspectives on the challenges and opportunities for using more precise and timely data to advance understanding and action on smart, sustainable, and healthy cities for all. 

Through interactive discussion, participants will explore the tension between whether bigger data means better data and the potential for improved public health intelligence to inform and transform action on major urban health challenges.


A CRITICAL DISCUSSION OF THE FUTURE OF HEALTH PROMOTION IN CANADA

Les présentateurs et présentatrices des séances peuvent répondre aux questions en français ou en anglais.

This interactive symposium on the future of health promotion will highlight the relevance of health promotion in Canada in 2018 and beyond, the opportunities and challenges that may arise, and promising concrete future directions for health promotion in Canada. 

This symposium will be particularly useful to those working in health promotion research and practice, as well as in policy and public health more broadly. Discussions will be inspired by the 4th edition of Health Promotion in Canada, released in November 2017.


EDUCATION FOR RECONCILIATION: AN EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING EXERCISE AND TRANSFORMING EMPATHY TO SOCIAL ACTION

This workshop will draw upon decolonizing, Indigenous and engaged pedagogies to walk participants through an experiential learning exercise aimed at enhancing intercultural capacity, understanding, empathy and respect for the immediate and inter-/trans-generational impacts on Indigenous peoples’ health. The experiential exercise is a 30-minute simulated walk-through of a series of colonial historical events that have impacted Indigenous peoples in Canada.  The exercise engages participants in reflecting on their own experience in order to build empathy, understanding, and mutual respect, and encourages participants towards transformation and social action. 

The experiential exercise is followed by 60 minutes of reflection, deconstruction and discussion of the exercise. Discussion topics include:

  1. Identity: deconstructing racism, stereotypes and their impacts on health and well-being.
  2. Grief and Loss: Inter-/trans-generational impacts of trauma.
  3. Impacts of colonialism: power/powerlessness.
  4. Indigeneity: resistance; reclaim, restore, revive and thrive; empowerment.
  5. Reconciliation: moving forward together to improve the health and well-being of all.

Applicability of the exercise:

  • Builds personal intercultural understanding that can be applied when working with Indigenous populations in Canada.
  • Transforms misconceptions/misunderstanding towards empathy and mutual respect, which can be applied to Culturally Safe Care.
  • A lesson plan will be provided to all participants for those interested in conducting this exercise in their classrooms or institutions. 

THE INTERNATIONAL FOOD POLICY STUDY: EVIDENCE ON POPULATION-LEVEL FOOD BEHAVIOURS TO EVALUATE POLICY IN CANADA, USA, UK, MEXICO AND AUSTRALIA

The symposium will present findings from the first annual wave of the IFP study. Findings will be presented on several policy-relevant domains, including patterns of dietary intake, food labelling, food environment and activity spaces, exposure to food marketing and sources of nutrition information, sugary drink consumption and perceptions, food security, and public support for food environment policy. 

In each of these domains, evidence will be presented from Canada and comparisons will be made with other countries, with an emphasis on differences between countries with and without specific policy measures, such as sugary drink taxes or differences in food labelling. The symposium will discuss implications for Canadian food policies under development, as well as implications for evaluating population-level policies using online cohort studies and smartphone technology. 


LEGALIZED CANNABIS: CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

Policy for cannabis legalization has been complicated by historical prohibition of this substance, which has hindered our ability to collect data and subsequently limited our understanding of its effects and consequences. In particular, environmental health perspectives are often lacking, as much of the available research focuses on clinical effects. Accordingly, new policy has relied heavily on “lessons learned” from other jurisdictions, parallels with tobacco and alcohol, and the precautionary principle. Above all, there is a recognized need for “agile” policy development as new data become available through legalization itself. 

As such, public health professionals have an imperative to identify and exploit old and new sources of information to improve nascent cannabis policy. This session will focus on some of the practice challenges faced by environmental health professionals due to data gaps and the types of comprehensive, collaborative information-gathering necessary to fill these gaps and continually improve cannabis policy in Canada.


LEARNING THAT STICKS: TEAM SIMULATION TRAINING FOR PUBLIC HEALTH PROFESSIONALS 

Public health often involves working with multi-disciplinary teams and across different sector who frequently have limited experience working together. Cross-sectoral differences are compounded by the need to work by correspondence, in crisis and in fast-paced volatile situations to protect or promote global public health. 

Experiential learning through simulations provides a safe environment where team members can work together to identify and overcome issues, apply new skills and knowledge, and ultimately perform more effectively in real-world situations. Participants will be introduced to the basic principles of experiential learning and simulation activities, and how Sims can contribute to improved team collaboration and functioning. Activities include developing a mock scenario, then presenting it to other participants, in order to receive constructive feedback and maximize the learning outcomes. The workshop will conclude with discussing how Sims could be applied to different areas of Public Health practice. The workshop was developed by the Global Health Sim team, including David Oldenburger (presenter), Thomas Piggott (presenter), Miranda Loutet, and Julie Zhang. Global Health Sim (ghsim.com) is a Canadian non-profit organization that aims to improve global health collaboration through experience-based capacity building activities for health professionals. 


REDUCING STIGMA THROUGH TRAUMA- AND VIOLENCE-INFORMED CARE: PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS IN FAMILY VIOLENCE, SEXUAL HEALTH AND HARM REDUCTION

Stigma negatively impacts health and well-being and is a significant barrier to the uptake of sexually transmitted and blood-borne infection (STBBI), sexual health and harm reduction services. Trauma- and violence-informed care (TVIC), which can be used to reduce stigma, has emerged from conceptual and empirical work in the area of health equity and trauma-informed practice in substance use and mental health settings, and draws attention to the impacts of both trauma (especially interpersonal violence)  and structural violence. 

During this interactive workshop for health and social services providers and leaders, participants will explore the relationship between trauma and stigma, and discuss the principles of TVIC in relation to individual provider and organizational practices. The Public Health Agency of Canada-funded VEGA Project, which integrated TVIC principles into its evidence-based guidance in family violence, will serve as a case example to promote participant reflection and dialogue on TVIC integration. Participants will engage in facilitated activities and discussions and leave with practical tools to build the skills needed for integration of TVIC in the areas of sexual health, harm reduction and STBBIs.