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Canadian Public Health Association

Séances simultanées 3

mardi le 29 mai de 16 h à 17 h 30

Les séances seront présentées dans la langue de leur titre. 

CONVERSATIONS SAVE LIVES: BRITISH COLUMBIA FIRST NATIONS IN THE OPIOID OVERDOSE EMERGENCY AND A SYSTEM-WIDE FRAMEWORK FOR ACTION 

In April 2016, the opioid emergency was declared a public health emergency by the British Columbia (BC) Provincial Health Officer under the Public Health Act due to the unprecedented increase in overdoses and deaths in the province. Since then, organizations across the province have been working toward providing emergency response and improved services to prevent overdose and death due to opioid use. This symposium will focus on the impact the opioid crisis has had on First Nations in BC and provide an overview of a partnered system-wide response to address it. 

This session will share how First Nations health organizations are exercising self-determination and responding with community-driven, nation-based programming that speaks to their unique community needs and is reflective of their own culturally relevant tools. Participants can expect to learn about the First Nations Health Authority’s system-wide framework for action, which includes 4 key action areas:1) Prevent people who overdose from dying; 2) Keep people safe when using substances; 3) Create an accessible range of treatment options; and 4) Support people on their healing journey.


ENGAGING YOUTH WITH LIVED EXPERIENCE IN PUBLIC HEALTH POLICY, PROGRAMS AND KNOWLEDGE TRANSLATION

Les présentateurs et présentatrices des séances peuvent répondre aux questions en français ou en anglais.

Though national and international bodies articulate the need for the engagement of persons with lived experience of illness into the design of their own care, young people have traditionally been excluded from shaping public health policy and/or programs in a significant way. Yet youth engagement is recognized in various disciplinary areas as an effective strategy for individual and community development and improved health outcomes. 

This session will demonstrate the why and how of youth engagement in a way that is adaptable to diverse organizations or projects. We will draw upon lessons learned from different examples, including the Wisdom2Action’s Youth Advisory Committee. Participants will hear about this essential topic directly from youth and from professionals with in-depth youth engagement experience.


HOW DO WE ASSESS LEARNING IN PUBLIC HEALTH EDUCATION: MAPPING LEARNING OBJECTIVES TO ASSESSMENTS OF LEARNING

présenté par : National Schools and Programs of Population and Public Health

Curriculum mapping demonstrates links between different parts of the curriculum, including learning outcomes and/or objectives, opportunities for learning, curriculum content, and the assessment of learning. Public health education attempts to support learners attaining public health competencies. Learning objectives usually map out for learners how this will be achieved in relation to one or more competencies. Less frequently are learners able to identify how this learning is mapped onto assessments of learning. 

During this workshop, participants will be exposed to curriculum mapping frameworks and approaches with the opportunity to apply them to selected areas of public health education. This workshop will be of interest to public health educators and public health learners seeking to appreciate the coherence of a learning opportunity, including enhancing assessment options to support self-directed learning.


RAPID REVIEWS 101

As public health organizations across Canada adopt and implement evidence-informed approaches to public health decision-making, there is a need for up-to-date evidence that can be applied to local contexts. While the most rigorous approach is to find or do a systematic review, timelines and resources often dictate a rapid review of the literature. Rapid reviews are tailored for a shorter timeline, but still use rigorous and transparent methodology to ensure that the best available research evidence is used in decision making. Join us for an overview and hands-on practice of the rapid review process. 

Participants will learn about and practice several steps of a rapid review. Resources required to support the rapid review process will be outlined so that participants can apply new knowledge and skills in their work settings.


SUGARY DRINK LEVIES:  DO THEY HAVE A PLACE IN HEALTHY EATING STRATEGIES IN CANADA?

As Canada and provinces/territories design new healthy eating strategies, questions have been raised around the role of a sugary drink levy. This interactive session will explore the value, challenges, support and opposition to a sugary drink levy in Canada. A brief overview of the current context of sugary drink taxes will be followed by assessment of consumption trends, the evidence base, discussion of implications, feasibility of taxation, and benefits – and challenges – to nutrition, health systems sustainability, health equity and food security. 

This session will allow participants to gain a better understanding of the issues around a sugary drink levy, to assess the merits and drawbacks of this measure from different viewpoints, and to consider what gaps in knowledge need to be closed in order to enable a better understanding of the issue. Participants will debate what lessons can be applied from other public health issues. The session can support researchers, policy makers, practitioners and advocates as they consider how to adopt, implement and support strategies, programs and policies to improve public health nutrition among Canadians.


SUPPORTING CANADIAN URBAN TRANSFORMATIONS AND BUILDING HEALTHIER CITIES: INTRODUCING THE MUSE TEAM AND PROGRAM OF RESEARCH AND KNOWLEDGE TRANSLATION STRATEGY

Cities today are key engines of economic activity, action towards environmental sustainability, cultural revival and vitality, and indeed human progress itself. Their centrality in Canadian life combined with accelerated change has led to a renewed interest in making cities healthier by recommitting to building physical and human infrastructure that promotes health in a way that is equitable and sustainable for future generations. 

Partnering with Chief Medical Health Officers in four Canadian cities (Montreal, Toronto, Saskatoon, and Vancouver), this symposium will introduce a program of research and knowledge translation strategy that is premised on building healthier cities through knowledge developed by understanding intersectoral partnerships aimed at transforming built environments and, in turn, comprehending citizens’ responses to built environment changes. Multisectoral Urban Systems for Health and Equity in Canadian Cities/Multisectorielles et urbaines : approches pour la santé et l’équité dans les villes canadiennes (or MUSE) aims to understand how urban built environment interventions are developed and implemented, and how they are received by citizens in Canadian cities.


TACKLING ALCOHOL-RELATED HARM BY IMPLEMENTING EFFECTIVE POLICIES 

Les présentateurs et présentatrices des séances peuvent répondre aux questions en français ou en anglais.

Alcohol is a leading cause of disease, trauma and social problems, involving harm to the drinker and others.  However, effective controls are being eroded. The public is not aware of the range of harms. Resources for effective action are often limited. This symposium involves presentations and time for discussion: emerging Canadian data on alcohol-related harm, international evidence on alcohol policies, association between marketing and youth drinking, and a framework for assessing the provinces with regard to effective responses. A CIHI-based presentation will provide new data on alcohol issues with provincial/territorial analysis. International evidence on alcohol pricing, physical availability, control system, marketing controls and impaired driving laws will be highlighted.  Results will be presented on the influence of alcohol marketing on subsequent drinking behaviours among youth. An assessment of the 10 provinces on 10 alcohol policy dimensions will be summarized, and a second phase outlined with broader foci and updated dimensions.


WHAT’S NEXT? LET’S TALK ABOUT THE FUTURE OF PUBLIC HEALTH SURVEILLANCE

présenté par : Alliance canadienne de surveillance régionale des facteurs de risque

This session will present a story about the past and present practice in public health surveillance, and will engage participants to join in the discussion about its future. In small groups, participants will explore topics of broad and current interest led by experts in the CARRFS network, such as the challenges in conducting surveillance in Quebec and in French-speaking populations across Canada; new and innovative data sources; emerging issues in surveillance; environmental health; multiple source data linkage; future data analysis methods; and knowledge translation.