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Canadian Public Health Association

Concurrent Sessions 5

Wednesday 1 May - 14:00-15:30

Subject to change.

BUILDING A COLLABORATIVE ENVIRONMENT: BRIDGING DISCIPLINES OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND PLANNING

The Public Health Agency of Canada released a report in 2017 discussing how the built environment can help create healthy lifestyles and ultimately improve health. Collaboration between public health and planning has great potential for developing healthy built environments (HBEs) that address the social determinants of health. A concerted, intersectoral and collaborative effort to integrate public health perspectives into planning and policy development can support the development of HBEs that foster not only more vibrant and liveable communities but can also facilitate health and resilience. This session will bring together a panel of speakers to address pathways, resources and tools for better integration of health into planning and influencing public policies that shape the built environment. Panelists will share examples of collaborations between public health and planning sectors, lessons learned, and insights on strengthening the "evidence to practice" link to influence decisions. Participants will be able to identify actionable steps for fostering collaboration between public health and planning groups, and reflect about implementation opportunities in their respective context.


EDUCATION FOR RECONCILIATION: DECOLONIZED AND ENGAGED PEDAGOGY - AN EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING EXERCISE TO TRANSFORM EMPATHY INTO SOCIAL ACTION

This workshop is an experiential-based learning exercise created by Indigenous scholar, teacher and researcher Dr. Jennifer Leason. It was created as a call to action to transform participants’ understanding about the impacts of colonization on Indigenous peoples in Canada. The exercise is centred on reconciliation, decolonization and Indigenization.

Reconciliation
The Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action (2015) aim to ensure all sectors:

  • Build student capacity for intercultural understanding, empathy, and mutual respect (p. 7, #62–63 iii), and
  • Offer skills-based training in intercultural competence training, conflict resolution, human rights and anti-racism (p. 3, #24).

Decolonized & Engaged Pedagogy
Decolonization and engaged pedagogy aims to transform consciousness through a paradigm shift from a culture of denial towards making space for Indigenous political philosophies, ways of knowing, being and doing.

Indigenzation Through Indigenous Pedagogy
Indigenous pedagogy is inclusive, holistic and reflective of Indigenous ways of teaching and learning. The Talking Circle is utilized as pedagogy to create a safe space, where each one is equal and each one belongs. Participants in a Talking Circle learn to listen and respect others, as well as taking turns sharing their thoughts, ideas, emotions and experiences. Indigenous pedagogy engages teaching/learning practices that connect the head, heart, and spirit to “transform people in powerful ways that may not be fully understood on a rational level alone” (Paulette Regan, 2010, p. 205). The transformation is to move beyond the mere description and theorizing about the impacts of colonization, towards the experience and transformation of understanding towards empathy and social action.


ENGAGING STUDENTS AND YOUNG PROFESSIONALS: WHAT CAN PUBLIC HEALTH ORGANIZATIONS DO?

This workshop will focus on what public health organizations can do to address the issue of a changing public health workforce and the engagement of students and young professionals (SYPs). Speaking from literature on trends in the public health workforce and the surveys and stakeholder engagements conducted by the World Federation of Public Health Associations’ Student and Young Professional Working Group, this workshop will encourage participants to consider local application and implementation of the recommendations. 

Based on a global survey completed with the aid of the World Federation of Public Health Associations’ Students and Young Professionals section, presenters will discuss tangible strategies for SYP engagement and metrics designed to assess the implementation of these recommendations by public health organizations. Participants will leave with an understanding of why SYP engagement is a critical issue, and specific programs and activities their organization can implement to engage SYPs.


ENGAGING TENANT LEADERSHIP IN STRATEGIES FOR ACHIEVING THE RIGHT TO HEALTHY, AFFORDABLE HOUSING 

This symposium will explore strategies in research and practice to address housing as it intersects with other determinants of health, featuring ongoing work in Vancouver, BC, Ottawa, ON and Owen Sound, ON. Specifically, the session will explore community-based research approaches that support local intersectoral efforts, including the role of public health, in tackling housing inadequacy as a key driver of health inequities. 

Participants will learn about research supporting tenant organizing strategies to address the inhabitable conditions of single room occupancy hotels in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, intersectoral research on the role and future of rooming houses in Ottawa, the RentSafe research initiative with public health and multiple other sectors on housing habitability in rural-based Owen Sound, and a novel Indigenous-led intersectoral table on homelessness in Owen Sound. Participants will have the opportunity to explore the emergent concept of Equity-focused Intersectoral Practice (EquIP) and how it can be used to promote meaningful intersectoral work to address systemic gaps and barriers. 


Monitoring the Sustainable Development Goals: Ensuring Equity in the Region of the Americas

Presented by: Pan American Health Organization

In this session, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) will present its corporate framework for the monitoring of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs 2030) in Latin America and the Caribbean. This framework is unique in that it incorporates the centrality of equity as part of its monitoring and analysis, which is a core principle of PAHO, to ensure No One is Left Behind in the Region. The framework is linked with the Sustainable Health Agenda for the Americas and PAHO's Strategic Plan, and builds accountability measures into country commitments. Presenters will discuss the development of the corporate framework, its application at the country level, country experience with inequalities monitoring, and information requirements.


PARTNERSHIPS FOR RACIAL EQUITY IN HEALTH

This workshop, offered by the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH), will continue the dynamic conversation from the plenary on Racism in Society at Public Health 2017, by motivating delegates to remain engaged in anti-racism dialogue and action. Specifically, this workshop will allow delegates to increase their own level of understanding of racism and to move towards a culture of racial equity in order to build and maintain partnerships that will have a powerful impact on racialized health inequities.  Using a combination of presentations, self-reflective exercises, and group work, the anticipated outcome of the workshop is to have participants return to their workplaces with key strategies, tools, and promising practices to advance racial equity through partnerships and effective stakeholder engagement to create systems change.


PREVENTING SUICIDE AMONG OLDER ADULTS:  RESPONDING TO A GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTH CHALLENGE

Suicide is a global cause of preventable mortality, claiming over 800,000 lives annually (WHO, 2014).  Older adults have high rates of suicide, and the older adult population is expanding rapidly. Relatively little research evidence exists regarding later-life suicide risk detection and prevention, and even promising interventions are rarely offered to at-risk individuals (Heisel & Duberstein, 2016). Systemic factors contribute to this problem, including increasing pressure on an already-strained public healthcare system and a relative paucity of providers trained in aging and mental health. This symposium will focus on suicide prevention in later life, sharing mental health, public health, and social justice perspectives.  

Participants will benefit from a review of the epidemiology of later-life suicide, risk and resiliency indicators, evidence-based and promising approaches to suicide risk detection and intervention, and interactive discussion on healthcare challenges, opportunities, and the need for novel public health solutions to this growing problem.


TACKLING INEQUITIES IN HEALTH CARE: THE HEIA TOOL

The Ontario Government has identified health equity as a key component of health care. As a result, identifying and responding to health inequities has become a growing concern for organizations across the province. 

But how do we tackle this concern? Ontario’s Health Equity Impact Assessment, or HEIA, is a key tool. 

HEIA guides organizations in identifying and preventing the unintended health inequities that may result from a policy, program or service that might have an impact on people’s health. 

HEIA can help:

  • Build health equity into an organization’s decision-making process;
  • Raise awareness about health equity in an organization;
  • Spot the unintended effects of a policy or program on the health of vulnerable or marginalized groups; and
  • Improve the design of policies or programs to increase the positive, and reduce the negative, health equity impacts.

Our HEIA training explores key concepts related to health equity and goes on to examine the HEIA tool in detail. Participants will think about how the HEIA tool can be applied to their own practice and follow a series of guided steps to plan for their own HEIA.


VACCINATION IN PREGNANCY: TO VACCINATE OR NOT….THAT IS THE QUESTION!

Vaccination during pregnancy offers a safe option that improves outcomes for mothers and babies, yet many pregnant women choose not to receive vaccinations. By understanding the factors that influence decisions and practices of women’s healthcare providers, improvements and changes to antenatal care provision can be recommended. Ultimately, changes in practice can have a long-term impact on the number of cases of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality related to vaccine-preventable illnesses during pregnancy, and this can be translated into potential cost savings to the healthcare system.  

Symposium participants will gain insight into current practices of maternal healthcare providers and the barriers to optimizing immunization coverage during pregnancy. Participants will learn about strategies to mitigate the challenges and how they can receive training to feel confident and competent counselling about vaccination during pregnancy. They will receive specific guidance on the influenza and Tdap vaccines.