Main navigation english

Canadian Public Health Association

Concurrent Sessions 3

Tuesday 30 April - 15:45 - 17:15

Subject to change.

BASIC INCOME: AN IDEA WHOSE TIME HAS COME? AN INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP TO BUILD PUBLIC HEALTH CAPACITY

This workshop will convene a public health discussion on basic income. Facilitators will provide an overview of evidence on basic income; then, through facilitated discussion, they will focus on the role of public health practitioners, and the potential policy levers at different orders of government (local, provincial, and federal) that could be used to move basic income ideas and the evidence base forward in Canada. We welcome participants who have been involved in basic income research and advocacy in their jurisdictions, as well as those who are new to the topic and interested in learning more. Following this workshop, delegates will be able to facilitate a conversation on basic income-related actions in their own jurisdictions.


BUILDING ORGANIZATIONAL CAPACITY FOR HEALTH EQUITY ACTION

Organizational capacity for health equity, the ability of an organization to identify existing health inequities and act to reduce them, is a key area of investment for public health organizations. In pursuit of health equity, organizations must assess and build their organizational capacity to engage in deep and sustained action. The National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health is implementing a participatory initiative (evidence synthesis, learning circle, direct support to public health organizations) to identify frameworks, strategies and organizational conditions that support organizational capacity for health equity action.  
    
Speakers will share perspectives on how the initiative is achieving the anticipated outcomes to support public health organizations to identify components of organizational capacity needed to enable health equity action and shift their practice. Participants will learn about domains of organizational health equity capacity and a multi-level approach to organizational change. Delegates will be introduced to the experiences of public health organizations developing organizational-level change activities to support action to improve health equity. 


CAIRE AND PIPER: LEADING RESEARCH ON THE SCIENCE, SAFETY, EFFECTIVENESS AND FEASIBILITY OF IMMUNIZATION IN PREGNANCY IN CANADA

Immunization in pregnancy is routinely recommended in Canada to protect against influenza and pertussis. However, coverage is not high. This is due in part to hesitancy about vaccination and in part to lack of streamlined delivery systems during pregnancy care. This symposium will present Canadian research on the science of vaccine safety and effectiveness in pregnancy, explore the feasibility issues related to immunization in pregnancy, and enable discussion of potential solutions to improving uptake of immunization in pregnancy. 

Participants will leave the session better informed about the strong evidence base that supports the safety of immunization in pregnancy. They will have contributed to an active discussion on addressing hesitancy and feasibility issues in providing immunization during pregnancy. The information can be used by participants to strengthen the quality of advice, support championing of immunization in pregnancy, and increase access to immunization.


DEFINING THRESHOLDS FOR INDOOR TEMPERATURES AS A PUBLIC HEALTH ISSUE

Most heat-related fatalities occur in an indoor setting, with exposure to high indoor temperatures forming an underlying cause of many heat-related fatalities during extreme heat events. Climate change is expected to increase the frequency, severity and duration of extreme events, yet currently there is no guidance on maximum indoor temperature that could be considered a threshold to inform prevention strategies or heat protection measures. 

This session aims to introduce the need for the identification of maximum indoor temperature thresholds in support of effective health adaptation to heat in the context of the changing climate. Participants will be introduced to a complex public health issue, the directions that have been taken, and considerations being analyzed to inform future action. This session offers participants an opportunity to participate in the policy analysis process and influence future public health activities by speaking to vulnerabilities, considerations, and opportunities for collaboration.


ESTABLISHING FIRST NATIONS POPULATION HEALTH AND WELLNESS INDICATORS FOR THE NEXT 10 YEARS

The Office of the Provincial Health Officer (PHO) of British Columbia (BC) and the Office of the Chief Medical Officer (OCMO) of the First Nations Health Authority (FNHA) have develop a renewed set of 15 indicators to help advance First Nations Population Health and Wellness in the Province of BC by setting an agenda for the next 10 years (2019 to 2029). This symposium will focus on a case example of how BC is transforming population health reporting on First Nations at a provincial level. By privileging Indigenous worldviews and knowledge, and expanding current population and public health discourse, the new indicators move away from a sickness- and deficit-based view of health to a more holistic and strengths-based perspective on health. 

This session will share how a Two-Eyed Seeing approach was used to develop the indicators. Participants can expect to learn about the First Nations Perspective on Health and Wellness and how such a framework can be applied in their public health reporting, research, or community initiatives.


FRONT-OF-PACKAGE NUTRITION LABELS: EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE TO GUIDE NATIONAL AND GLOBAL POLICY DEVELOPMENT 

The symposium will provide an overview of FOP labelling and summarize findings from three studies investigating the impact of FOP nutrition labelling systems. The studies presented in this symposium use innovative research designs (both Canadian and international) to assess consumer understanding and purchasing behaviours in response to different FOP labelling systems. All studies compared different FOP label designs to explore differences between Canada’s proposed ‘high in’ system and other common FOP label formats used internationally. 

Participants will gain an understanding of the status of FOP regulations in Canada and internationally, and will become familiar with different experimental methods that can be used to assess FOP labels and other nutrition policies. The session will also provide a context for discussion of the potential benefits, weaknesses and policy implications of the many different FOP nutrition labelling formats. 


Knowledge translation strategies for action – Let’s talk about the future of public health surveillance!

Presented by: Canadian Alliance for Regional Risk Factor Surveillance (CARRFS)

A cornerstone of public health surveillance is getting the right information to the right people in a timely fashion for them to act and change for the better.

This session focuses on knowledge translation strategies for action. First, we explore the foundations of knowledge transfer asking “Why we need knowledge transfer and what are the basic principles of knowledge transfer?” and “Is there a gap between science and policy?” Then we will delve deeper into the last 8 of the 12 steps for successfully translating knowledge to action, examining public health successes including health proverbs, chronic disease clock, making information accessible and readable, motivating and rewarding users. Then it will be time to look to the future. The upcoming impacts of new computer technologies, improved statistical analyses, data visualizations, improved information dissemination, and information technology are scrutinized. Also, what new networks of professionals are evolving and how clinicians and public health professionals are beginning to interact in an emerging field of “Clinical Public Health” are examined.


MIGRATION AND HEALTH: GLOBAL JOURNEYS THROUGH POLICY AND PRACTICE

This workshop will facilitate the exploration of the global, regional, national and local contexts that shape the everyday experiences of health and health care of migrating people and families. We will briefly share some key issues, and then will share the results of research through role-play case exercises. Participants will run through a simulated experience of the journey and settlement of migrating families as they navigate systems and policies. Through role-play exercises, workshop participants will learn how to assess the health equity impact of policy and practice through reflection on their experiences in the role play that expose health consequences experienced along the journey of migration and settlement. 

After the role-play exercise, participants will be divided into teams to develop a group health equity impact assessment of one of the policy/practice examples from the role play. The groups will then present their analysis to inform a collective story of how health equity is compromised in the migration journey. Lastly, the group will recommend policy and practice changes that align with principles of equity.


Public Health and Climate Change: From Evidence to Action 

Presented by: Ontario Public Health Association

The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified climate change as the defining issue for public health in the 21st  century.  Scientific evidence on the health impacts of climate change has been mounting over the last year, along with media and public attention. Hear from experts about the latest evidence on health impacts–in particular the health equity implications for individuals and communities–as well as actions being planned and underway at the national level. Learn from practitioners about leading public health practices in local mitigation and adaptation. The Ontario Public Health Association will share its learnings from the development of a provincial health-related climate communications campaign. This session will provide delegates with an opportunity to discuss how public health professionals can promote collaboration with others to build greater awareness about climate change-related health risks as well as actions that can be taken to improve population health. 


TAILORED TO FIT: MAKING ADAPTATIONS TO EVIDENCE-BASED PUBLIC HEALTH PROGRAMS

Adaptations to evidence-based public health programs are commonplace. These adaptations are primarily made to enhance the cultural relevance of the program, and can therefore improve uptake of the program. However, adaptations also tend to be reactive and disconnected from the theory and evidence base of the program, which threatens programs’ effectiveness. A practical method of adapting programs while considering their theory and evidence basis is required. 

In this workshop, facilitators will describe when, why and how adaptations are made to public health programs. Practical implementation science frameworks will be discussed. Conference delegates will be engaged in two interactive activities: 1) identifying and unpacking different types of adaptations, and 2) using frameworks to plan adaptations so that the learnings can be directly applied to their own work. By the end of this workshop, delegates will have a sound understanding of how to consider program adaptations before and during implementation.