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Canadian Public Health Association

Concurrent Sessions 1

Tuesday 30 April - 10:45 - 12:15

Subject to change.

Future-Proofing Public Health in Canada: a fireside chat with four public health agency heads

Presented by: Canadian Institutes of Health Research

The CIHR Institute of Population and Public Health is bringing together the leaders of Canada’s four national and provincial public health agencies for a fireside chat to discuss the key challenges and opportunities that we will face in the next 10 years and discuss strategies to future-proof public health.
This informal discussion will touch on emerging topic areas of public health importance and areas where we anticipate future challenges, which will include topic suggestions from the audience. Examples of topics for discussion include: 

  • Researchers and decision-makers have access to ever-increasing amounts of data. There is an increasing demand for new ‘smart’ technologies and an increased interest in using artificial intelligence (AI) approaches to inform planning and decision-making, especially in an era of ‘precision health’. What are the implications of these trends for public health and health equity? How should public health engage in these issues?
  • The world is becoming increasingly urbanized; population demographics are shifting towards older populations; we are increasingly impacted by disruptors to our environment such as climate change. What is public health’s role in promoting and supporting healthy, resilient and sustainable cities?

This session will stimulate a lively discussion forecasting future challenges and opportunities for public health based on current and emerging societal trends. Discussants and the audience will be encouraged to think proactively to anticipate challenges and opportunities that may arise in the next 10 years, and about how public health can position itself as a leader in ensuring future generations are able to achieve a healthy, inclusive, and sustainable future.


PROMOTING HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS FOR YOUTH THROUGH COMPREHENSIVE SEXUALITY EDUCATION: WHAT DOES THE EVIDENCE TELL US?

Presented by: Canadian Public Health Association

Previous research has found that sexual health education is delivered inconsistently across Canada, with significant variation in the amount and mode of instruction as well as the topics covered. Generally, youth report a desire to learn more about healthy relationships and sexual pleasure, topics often unaddressed through school curricula. Although preliminary evidence and theory suggest that addressing these topics through sexuality education programs could contribute to dating violence prevention (DVP) amongst youth, current evaluations are limited with respect to measurement of DVP-related outcomes.

This presentation will outline themes from the literature and interviews with experts in the field, and highlight the primary issues faced by Canadian youth as well as the need for a youth-informed approach to DVP. Through facilitated discussion, participants will be invited to reflect and share their thoughts on possible strategies to overcome some of the current barriers related to the implementation and evaluation of DVP programming in Canada.


Social and Cultural Aspects of Antibiotic Use

Presented by: Public Health Agency of Canada

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the emerging public health challenges of the 21st century in Canada and across the world. Panellists will discuss the social and cultural drivers of antibiotic use, including deeply held beliefs, culture, and habits that underpin use and prescription patterns.  They will also present lessons learned by addressing the social context and its impact on behaviour change through various multi-sectoral initiatives with practitioners and the public. Dr. Theresa Tam, Chief Public Health Officer, will facilitate the session. Panellists will include key international and local experts in policy, health and agricultural practice, research, and those with living experience.


Oral Presentations

Details to follow.